Imbrication


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imbrication

[‚im·brə′kā·shən]
(geology)
Formation of an imbricate structure. Also known as shingling.

Imbrication

Overlapping rows of shaped tiles or shingles that resemble overlapping fish scales; it is also called fish-scale pattern.

imbrication

imbrication
Overlapping rows of shaped tiles or shingles that resemble overlapping fish scales; also see contre-imbrication.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lastly, in the northern part of the area, imbrication of the thrust structure has occurred, resulting in repetition of the thrust plane and basement-cover contact in Little Falls Brook.
Such "forensic" reading listens for the lost voice at the core of each echo, attempts to make visible its material and other consequences, and asks how literary forms and modes can work to regenerate cultures of rights over time in places where the law has stopped--as demonstrated, in this case, by the historical imbrication of these atrocities, both past and present, insisted upon by the poets themselves.
Variations along strike in the High Zagros occur at the same places as within the Simply Folded Belt, and the intense imbrication of the Bakhtyari Culmination is not matched by similar thrusting of the Arabian plate margin in regions to the northwest or southeast.
Her discussion of the poem as a text that creates and defers desire and that uses stylistic shifts to do so; her sly critique of anti-sex moralists; her appreciation of Venus's anarchic eroticism--all these make for a persuasive and stylish engagement with a poem that has often stymied other critics and show what her book aims to do, namely, to reveal how the imbrication of theory and practical criticism can produce landmark work.
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After acknowledging her reliance on the colonial archive, she deftly reads archival sources against the grain to shed light on the imbrication of Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in the creation of urban space in each city.
She also states that Dixon Gottschild "parses the imbrication of race and cultural production in order to stage a rhizomatic history.
This leads onto Chapter 4, 'The role of the state', which shows that public and private activities were not always clearly separated and there was often a close imbrication of merchants carrying state cargoes and trading on their own account; likewise, soldiers occasionally describe themselves as 'merchants'.
Nevertheless, the president's linkage of a lasting cessation of hostilities with the long lease that recording devices grant to cultural artifacts--instruments which will "stand the test of time"--is telling of the deep imbrication of media in the institutions, infrastructures, and legislation-making of empire and colony alike, of nation-state and transnational polity.
In the case of Golley and Leathers's work, we find a complex imbrication of baroque and modern.
I prefer the one-state solution as both more humanist and more practical: humanist because it dwells on the commonalty of Palestinians and Israelis (or Jews and non-Jews) rather than on their differences, practical because of the profound imbrication of the populations.
attitudes toward the imbrication of race, sex, and political radicalism.