Imbrication


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imbrication

[‚im·brə′kā·shən]
(geology)
Formation of an imbricate structure. Also known as shingling.

Imbrication

Overlapping rows of shaped tiles or shingles that resemble overlapping fish scales; it is also called fish-scale pattern.

imbrication

imbrication
Overlapping rows of shaped tiles or shingles that resemble overlapping fish scales; also see contre-imbrication.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unique as a weight loss procedure, gastric imbrication is a reversible procedure with no device required to be implanted and no stomach tissue removed.
In particular, Gilmartin is able to focus with great precision on the contradictoriness, precariousness, and self-critique evident in radical print culture precisely because of its imbrication with a public opinion still channelled through an unrepresentative House of Commons.
At a performance conference during the opening week of the Tanks, an audience member raised the question of the Tate's imbrication in a neoliberal economy of spectacle and culturetainment.
The editors provide an articulate and useful exposition of the polysemic, and labile, notion of queer, emphasizing its resistance to norms of gender as well as to fixed categories of sexual orientation and, indeed, insisting on the conceptual imbrication of the two.
Her work inserted a micro-civil society within a specifically Korean structure, constructed according to international norms of technology and aesthetics: precisely the kind of complex imbrication of the local and the global that the "Garden of Learning" posed as an alternative to business as usual in the art world.
In the first of these, he considers Ulster poetry through Barthes's notion of myth and through its imbrication with notions of the political, in a critical spread from Michael Longley's 1969 essay 'Strife and the Ulster Poet' to writers such as Michael Foley and Padraic Fiacc.
The curators include striking examples of Lippard's own involvement in works of art, a reflexive imbrication that itself constitutes a mode of reception.
Novel Possibilities explores the thorough and evolving imbrication of novelistic and extra-novelistic 'political' discourses during the first half of the nineteenth century, building upon the work of critics such as Nancy Armstrong, Catherine Gallagher, and Mary Poovey.
In her seminal 1979 essay charting the possibilities for postwar sculpture, Rosalind Krauss pointed to photography's imbrication within the medium's
Seifert is much better when he brings out the 'ambiguities' of the fairy tale vogue, and its own imbrication in the particular tensions of the period.
In its succinct imbrication of spiritual yearning, late-capitalist work ethic, and new-age lifestyle, The Wave serves as something of a key to Lichtenstein's latest series, "The Searchers" (2004-).
The interrelation or imbrication of photography and cinema, the stasis of one and motion of the other, is a central motif in Cinevardaphoto, where it becomes synonymous with the workings of memory.