hierarchy

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hierarchy:

see ministryministry,
in religion, term used to designate the clergy of Protestant churches, particularly those who repudiate the claims of apostolic succession. The ceremony by which the candidate receives the office of a minister is called ordination.
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 and orders, holyorders, holy
[Lat. ordo,=rank], in Christianity, the traditional degrees of the clergy, conferred by the Sacrament of Holy Order. The episcopacy, priesthood or presbyterate, and diaconate were in general use in Christian churches in the 2d cent.
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Hierarchy

An arrangement or system of ranking one above the other or arranged in a graded series or sequence such as size (large to small), shape (similar or dissimilar), and placement (emphasis or location).

Hierarchy

 

the ordering of parts or elements of a whole from the highest to the lowest.

The term “hierarchy” was introduced not earlier than the second half of the fifth century by Pseudo-Dionysius in his treatises The Celestial Hierarchy and The Ecclesiastical Hierarchy. Until the 19th century, it was used to describe the organization of the Christian church. The development of the conception of hierarchy in science began in the second half of the 19th century. In the social sciences, the conception of hierarchy was originally used to describe class-estate divisions in an antagonistic society (for example, feudal hierarchy) and to characterize the structure of authority, especially of bureaucracy. In contemporary bourgeois sociology, numerous research studies have been devoted to the hierarchy of prestige, the hierarchy of wealth, and the hierarchy of power and control as an expression of social stratification and of social inequality.

With the appearance of the general systems theory in the 20th century, the conception of hierarchy was applied to describe any system objects. Hierarchically organized forms exist in all spheres of objective reality: inorganic, biological, and social. In Marxist philosophy, the idea of the hierarchy of qualitatively irreducible structural levels of matter has been developed. In general organizational theory, hierarchy is seen as the principle of control that secures the effective functioning of the organization. The hierarchy of levels (tiers) of a language is distinguished in linguistics. In graph theory the hierarchically constructed graph (the so-called tree) is used.

L. A. SEDOV

hierarchy

1. Religion a body of persons in holy orders organized into graded ranks
2. Taxonomy a series of ordered groupings within a system, such as the arrangement of plants and animals into classes, orders, families, etc.
3. Linguistics Maths a formal structure, usually represented by a diagram of connected nodes, with a single uppermost element
4. government by an organized priesthood

hierarchy

An organisation with few things, or one thing, at the top and with several things below each other thing. An inverted tree structure. Examples in computing include a directory hierarchy where each directory may contain files or other directories; a hierarchical network (see hierarchical routing), a class hierarchy in object-oriented programming.

hierarchy

A structure that has a predetermined ordering from high to low. For example, all files and folders on the hard disk are organized in a hierarchy (see Win Folder organization).
References in periodicals archive ?
They maintained that Fr Clonan's immediate superior - Fr Michael McTernan - at the Coundon church had been alerted to his Clonan's activities when complaints had been made about him as early as 1974, but had not acted upon the information.
Requires the immediate superior in command (ISIC) to ensure timely safety investigations are being conducted.
Upbraided by his immediate superior, my friend replied, "Harry, if you knew how much I drank last night, you'd be amazed I'm here at all.
David McElhinney, the city's executive director for central services and Mr Finnegan's immediate superior, launched an investigation into the council's news department and shortly afterwards Mr Finnegan was ordered to clear his desk.
The official, whose accusation of ball-tampering against Pakistan led to the protest which prematurely ended the fourth Test against England, emailed his immediate superior, Doug Cowie, with the proposal as the row threatened to wreck the one-day series between the two countries.
Initially the aggrieved party should be encouraged to have an informal meeting with their immediate superior to discuss the problem, and try to resolve it without using the formal procedure.
In an organisation like the Defence Forces, where the person doing the bullying may be your immediate superior, it is essential that there be an independent person to whom a complaint can be made to.
Such controversy, or even the mere presentiment that it would arise, shaped some cautious policy-making by Roy Emerson Stryker, chief of the Historical Section of the Resettlement Administration and his immediate superior, Rexford Tugwell.
Sambur, who was Druyun's immediate superior as assistant secretary for acquisition beginning in 2001, said he does not feel responsible for the scandal.
The bungled operation persuaded the Government to put the three SB officers and their immediate superior on trial in an attempt at 'damage limitation'.
The lapses and rationalizations Rutkowski reveals bring on a return of the madness that overcame him twenty years earlier, goaded by an immediate superior whose pestilent bravado still holds him in thrall.
Vogts' crime is also compounded by the stance taken by his immediate superior Taylor.

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