white blood cell

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white blood cell:

see bloodblood,
fluid pumped by the heart that circulates throughout the body via the arteries, veins, and capillaries (see circulatory system; heart). An adult male of average size normally has about 6 quarts (5.6 liters) of blood.
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white blood cell

[′wīt ′bləd ‚sel]
(histology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers say it is like 'cutting the brakes' and allowing immune cells to do the rest.
The results of the studies demonstrated that the approach outlined, using siRNA to silence NR2F6 activity in human immune cells, is effective at stimulating the type of immune response associated with known checkpoint inhibitors.
Each participant had their immune cells harvested from the blood, then researchers applied zinc-finger nucleases to edit genomes.
Because TGF-beta is known to control immune cell maturation, the researchers homed in on a group of cells known as regulatory T cells, which keep tabs on other immune cells to ensure that they don't go into overdrive.
Once the immune cells are in the bloodstream they use other molecules called "intercellular adhesion molecules," or ICAMs, to help them exit and enter the brain or spinal cord.
When the team disabled the autoimmune regulator, the AIRE gene that suppresses autoimmune diseases, immune cells began attacking pancreatic cells secreting digestive enzymes, sparing the mice from type I diabetes, they said.
Family 3 is directed at the procedure and immune cell product used by Cancer Vac to deliver its immunotherapy.
But in his weakened state, Getty would also be less able to fight off any baboon diseases - or baboon immune cells attempting to destroy his body.
An immune profile based on the relative abundance of three immune cells in the tumors - the killer T cell, the macrophage, and another immune cell known as a helper T cell - accurately predicted overall survival from the disease, determined whether an individual's cancer was prone to metastasize, and predicted whether it would recur once treated.
In so doing, it causes the immune cells to remain in the body's lymphatic tissue and hinders them from entering sites of inflammation in the central nervous system or other tissues.
So if a sex partner transmits HIV to them, the virus cannot dock with a molecule on the surface of the CD-4 immune cells.