Impost

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Related to Imposts: Duty of Tonnage

impost

[′im‚pōst ‚ärch]
(architecture)
The highest part of a column, pillar, pier, or wall upon which the end of an arch rests.

Impost

The horizontal molding or capital on top of a pilaster, pier, or corbel which receives and distributes the thrust at the end of an arch.

impost

1. A masonry unit or course, often distinctively profiled, which receives and distributes the thrust at each end of an arch. Also see abutment, springer.
2. A vertical member in a gemel or double window taking the place of a mullion; an integral mullion.
References in periodicals archive ?
15, 1788 ("[A]ll the officers for collecting these taxes, stamp duties, imposts and excises, are to be appointed by the general government, under its direction, not accountable to the States; nor is there even a security that they shall be citizens of the respective States, in which they are to exercise their offices; at the same time the construction of every law imposing any and all these taxes and duties, and directing the collection of them, and every question arising thereon, and on the conduct of the officers appointed to execute these laws, and to collect these taxes and duties so various in their kinds, are taken away from the courts of justice of the different States, and confined to the courts of the general government.
4) All of these special backroom deals represent gross violations of Article I Section 8, which mandates state equality: "But all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States.
Regulate commerce" was also a synonym for nationalizing the state tariffs or imposts, but that is a tax or revenue issue covered by other constitutional clauses.
AVCC president Professor Schreuder said that at a time of growing international travel uncertainty associated with terrorism and SARS, Australian universities had hoped for, and expected, more than a $90 million impost on international education providers.
The Provisional Constitution's tariff clause reads: "The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises for the revenue necessary to pay the debts and carry on the Government of the Confederacy; and alt duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the States of the Confederacy.
These custom duties and related trade imposts were indirect taxes, rather than direct taxes, and the revenues accruing from them were only of secondary importance.
Nonetheless, on stylistic grounds the angel cannot be much later than the console with Iustitia and the imposts from the main entrance, which the figure resembles so closely in the handling of the drapery that it may well be by the same hand.
The East India Company, the Levant Company, and other chartered companies willingly paid the imposts levied by the early Stuarts in exchange for royal support of their monopolies.
When their output becomes inadequate to meet the increasing expenditure, the sultan introduces new imposts.
When tax assessments and imposts upon the subjects are low, the people have the energy and desire to do things.
Like other Palestinian institutions, Birzeit University bears a heavy burden of Israeli taxes and financial imposts.
The Uniformity Clause says that "all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States.