Imprint


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imprint

[′im‚print]
(geochemistry)

Imprint

 

basic data concerning a publication, intended to provide information to readers as well as for library and bibliographic processing, and the accounting and planning of publishing output.

General bibliographical imprints (the author’s last name, the title, name of the publishing house, place and year of publication, and so forth) are placed on the binding, the cover, and the title page. Publisher’s registration imprints are printed most frequently on the lower part of the last page of the book and more rarely, on the reverse of the title page. These provide the last names of people who have taken part in creating the book and are responsible for its quality (the editor in chief, the literary, art, and technical editors, the proofreaders, and the graphic designer). Also included in the publisher’s registration imprint are the dates when the copy was sent for typesetting and printing, quantitative data about the publication (size of the paper, the number of printed and registered published pages, and the circulation), as well as the order number, price, and names and addresses of the publishing house and the printing plant.

I. D. KULIDZHANOVA

References in periodicals archive ?
Imprint specialises in manufacturing and supplying point-of-sale and large-format outdoor media and runs a 24/7 operation at the 7,400 sq m Newburn facility.
In this research, SBA-15 hexagonal channels are used as nano-reactor in order to carry out the reaction between the imprint molecules and monomers.
Next, the researchers strengthened the magnetic field applied to the atom cloud to protect the imprint from interfering atoms.
MII is leveraging its innovative Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL(R)) with Drop-on-Demand(TM) material application technology to become the worldwide market and technology leader in high-volume patterning solutions for storage and memory devices, while enabling emerging markets in optics, biotechnology, and other industries.
Rosemary Davidson, who joined CCV in June 2007 from Bloomsbury, will be responsible for the new imprint.
A particularly fickle suitor, Harlequin is pursuing black readers while concurrently courting women over 35 with its Next imprint.
Not the imprint of the body itself most of the time, but the imprint of the pictograph, first drawn naively as a kind of folded mandorla that contained nothing but itself, and then multiplied in a fertility cult of the image as prolific as the mass culture of the mechanical reproduction with which it disseminates itself.
I'm confident the revenues will result in profitable LawRx and IncRx imprints, but I'm not sure how smoothly the operation will perform internally.
The keyboard teacher or player can stamp this imprint onto any paper or music score, then mark the desired notes or finger positions.
Forest of Peace will remain an active imprint with its publisher, Thomas Turkle, staying on as a consultant during and after the transition.
Molecular imprinting involves the synthesis of polymers in the presence of an imprint or template compound (the substance to be analyzed or analyte) to produce cavities on the polymer that are selective for that analyte.