winter

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winter

1. 
a. the coldest season of the year, between autumn and spring, astronomically from the December solstice to the March equinox in the N hemisphere and at the opposite time of year in the S hemisphere
b. (as modifier): winter pasture
2. the period of cold weather associated with the winter

What does it mean when you dream about winter?

A winter dreamscape could indicate the dreamer’s favorite time of the year for fun and frolic. However, winter is also a season in which many people experience depression. This dream could indicate an emotional withdrawal from a personal relationship or a withdrawing of one’s emotional investment in the workplace.

winter

[′win·tər]
(astronomy)
The period from the winter solstice, about December 22, to the vernal equinox, about March 21; popularly and for most meteorological purposes, winter is taken to include December, January, and February in the Northern Hemisphere, and June, July, and August in the Southern Hemisphere.

first point of Capricornus

first point of Capricornusclick for a larger image
That point on the ecliptic occupied by the sun at the maximum southerly declination. Sometimes called the December solstice, the first point of Capricornus. The same as the winter solstice, the first point of Libra. The point of the intersection of the ecliptic and the celestial equator (equinoctial). When the sun is moving from the north to the south direction. It is denoted by the symbol image. Also called the winter, or December, equinox.

Maidyarem (Maidhyairya; Mid-Year or Winter Feast)

December-January, May, June; 16th-20th days of Dae, the 10th Zoroastrian month
Maidyarem is the fifth of the six great seasonal feasts, known as gahambars, of the Zoroastrian religion. It was traditionally celebrated at a point in the agricultural year when, due to extreme cold, all work came to a halt. The name comes from the word airya, which means "rest."
The six gahambars were typically joyous festivals that included such activities as special rituals and prayers, and the sharing of food. Although they lasted five days, the fifth day was the only one spent in actual celebration; the other four were for preparation and anticipation of the day's feasting, when families or neighborhoods would get together. These seasonal feasts were designed to give those who worked from dawn to dusk on farms a respite from their labors. Today, with so many Zoroastrians living in urban areas, the importance of the gahambars has diminished.
The Zoroastrian calendar has 12 months of 30 days each, plus five extra days at the end of the year. Because of discrepancies in the calendars used by widely separated Zoroastrian communities around the world, there are now three different calendars in use, and Maidyarem can fall either in December-January, May, or June according to the Gregorian calendar.
There are only about 100,000 followers of Zoroastrianism today, and most of them live in northwestern India or Iran. Smaller communities exist in Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Canada, the U.S., England, and Australia.
SOURCES:
RelHolCal-2004, p. 69

Winter

Boreas
the north wind; associated with winter. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 130]
crane
pictorial emblem in Buddhist tradition. [Animal Symbol-ism: Jobes, 378]
Ded Moroz
personification of winter; “Grandfather Frost.” [Russ. Folklore: Misc.]
goat
zodiacally belongs to December; hence, winter. [Astrology: Hall, 139]
Hiems
personification; portrayed as old and decrepit. [Rom. Myth.: LLEI, I: 322]
Jack Frost
personification of winter. [Pop. Culture: Misc.]
Old Man Winter
personification of winter. [Pop. Culture: Misc.]
old man wrapped in cloak
personification of winter. [Art: Hall, 130]
Persephone
the period of her stay (winter) with Hades. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 28]
References in classic literature ?
In winter the church is bitterly cold; it is not heated, and we sit muffled up in more furs than ever we wear out of doors ; but it would of course be very wicked for the parson to wear furs, however cold he may be, so he puts on a great many extra coats under his gown, and, as the winter progresses, swells to a prodigious size.
The streets through which our friends had to go to their work were all unpaved and full of deep holes and gullies; in summer, when it rained hard, a man might have to wade to his waist to get to his house; and now in winter it was no joke getting through these places, before light in the morning and after dark at night.
Thus Tess walks on; a figure which is part of the landscape; a fieldwoman pure and simple, in winter guise; a gray serge cape, a red woollen cravat, a stuff skirt covered by a whitey-brown rough wrapper, and buff-leather gloves.
Low informs me, that a neighbouring tribe of foot-Indians is now changing into horse-Indians: the tribe at Gregory Bay giving them their worn-out horses, and sending in winter a few of their best skilled men to hunt for them.
Hence we see that the central part of Tierra del Fuego is colder in winter, and no less than 9.