Dysphagia

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dysphagia

[dis′fā·jə]
(medicine)
Difficulty in swallowing, or inability to swallow, of organic or psychic causation.

Dysphagia

 

difficulty in the act of swallowing.

The causes of dysphagia are inflammations of the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, larynx, and mediastinum; foreign bodies; cicatricial stenoses and tumors; and certain nervous conditions. Swallowing is difficult or impossible and painful. Food or liquid get into the nose, larynx, and trachea. Dysphagia is treated by eliminating the primary condition.

References in periodicals archive ?
Some dancers report an inability to eat during intense performance schedules.
Little Annie Jones is painfully underweight as a direct result of a psychological inability to eat and retain food, which began when she was only three months old.
They commented on my sunken facial features, my lack of energy, and my inability to eat unless forced.
But many infants still endure terrible withdrawal symptoms, including fits where they stop breathing and turn blue, constant vomiting, diarrhoea, and inability to eat.
Symptoms include nausea, weakness, sweating, faintness, and, occasionally, diarrhea after eating, as well as the inability to eat sweets without becoming so weak and sweaty that the patient must lie down until the symptoms pass.
While it is difficult to imagine that the inability to eat, toilet, bath, dress, or transfer might-be caused by anything other than a health condition, perhaps the following hypothetical example of a person from a less industrialized and less technological culture will help.
Busulfan and other drugs cause discoloration of the skin, weakness, inability to eat and weight loss.
The Foundation is also a source of support, helping consumers on home tube and IV feeding overcome challenges such as their inability to eat and altered body image.
We heard from our senior living clients that weight loss and the inability to eat independently was often a catalyst for dementia disease progression.
BDR1 Angry, biting tendency, excessive salivation, gradually became drowsy BDR2 Angry, salivation, drooping of tongue, inability to drink or eat BDR3 Angry, salivation, frequent micturition, inability to drink or BDR4 Angry, inability to eat and drink, biting tendency BDR5 Angry, salivation, inability to eat and drink BDR6 Angry, salivation, trying to attack BDR7 Angry, salivation, trying to attack GenBank Sample accession no.
The largest single cause of health problems later in life is the inability to eat correctly.
Then there's the embarrassment factor: no matter how we try to bluff, we suspect our inability to eat just one chocolate digestive, then put away the packet makes us flawed as individuals.