excipient

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excipient

[ek′sip·ē·ənt]
(pharmacology)
Any inert substance combined with an active drug for preparing an agreeable or convenient dosage form.
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Product claims are directed to the formulation, and thus often recite details of the formulation such as the pharmaceutically inactive ingredients present.
The inactive ingredients are honey, molasses powder, nature identical chicken flavor, sodium caseinate and tartaric acid.
In addition to health effects caused by herbicides themselves, commercial herbicide mixtures often contain other chemicals, including inactive ingredients, which have negative impacts on human health.
The label of food and pharmaceutical product should also give information regarding inactive ingredients that sometimes becomes objectionable and questionable and abide by the halal food quality standards during the entire process of manufacturing and production of goods meant for human consumption.
The FDA has yet to determine which of the drugs or inactive ingredients cause the reactions.
The tablets also contain inactive ingredients colloquially referred to as 'talc'.
TERMS ON THE LABEL INFORMATION CONTAINED Active ingredient Therapeutic substance; amount per unit Uses Symptoms the drug is intended to treat Warnings When not to use; conditions requiring doctor's advice; side effects; when to stop Inactive ingredients Substances other than active ingredients (wax, corn starch, coloring, etc.
Underscoring the competitive nature of the pharmaceutical market, Holstrom pointed out that the FDA provides comprehensive lists of both active and inactive ingredients, as well as how those products can be safely combined.
All of the active and inactive ingredients used by Pro Tennis Premium Sunscreen are approved by the 2012 FDA regulations and have been thoroughly tested according to strict FDA standards.
Whereas in the past the fake drugs mostly contained inactive ingredients, increasingly underground manufacturers are inserting various doses of active ingredients to drum up repeat business'.
These include product cannibalism (in cases where the company is still achieving significant sales of the branded version of the drug), bio-identical effectiveness issues (generics are allowed to have an efficacy range of 80% to 125% of the branded version), side effects from inactive ingredients (as generics are allowed to use inert ingredients different from those used in the branded version), and intense competition with existing generic manufacturers which could result in a price war.
The sustained release technology could basically be a matrix (active ingredients are dispersed within the polymer) or a reservoir (active and inactive ingredients form the core which is encapsulated by membranes).

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