inclined plane

(redirected from Inclined planes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Inclined planes: Simple Machines

inclined plane,

simple machinemachine,
arrangement of moving and stationary mechanical parts used to perform some useful work or to provide transportation. From a historical perspective, many of the first machines were the result of human efforts to improve war-making capabilities; the term engineer
..... Click the link for more information.
, consisting of a sloping surface, whose purpose is to reduce the force that must be applied to raise a load. To raise a body vertically a force must be applied that is equal to the weight of the body, i.e., the product of its mass and the acceleration of gravity. The amount of work done (i.e., energy expended) in raising the body is equal to its weight times the distance through which it is raised. By means of an inclined plane a force smaller than the weight of the body can be exerted over a distance greater than the direct vertical distance, doing work equal to the product of the force and the distance through which it acts. If friction is ignored, the work done using the inclined plane will be exactly equal to the work done in lifting the body directly. In any real system some work is done to overcome friction between the plane and the load. The actual mechanical advantage of an inclined plane is the ratio of the load lifted to the force applied; ideally it is equal to the ratio of the length of the sloping plane to its vertical rise. An inclined plane whose sloping length is 5 m and whose vertical rise is 1 m has a mechanical advantage of 5; a 300-newton load can be moved up such a plane by a 60-newton force. The inclined plane has been modified in many ways. The screw and wedge are applications of the principle of the inclined plane but do not require that the load be moved vertically for their successful operation. The chisel, carpenter's plane, auger bit, and ax are some of the many tools based on this principle. Switchbacks on mountain roads are inclined planes that reduce the effort of an automobile engine but increase the distance a car must travel to ascend the mountain.

inclined plane

[′in‚klīnd ′plān]
(mechanics)
A plane surface at an angle to some force or reference line.
References in periodicals archive ?
ART: You can use the six types of simple machines--levers, pulleys, screws, inclined planes, wheels and axles, and wedges--to make your own Rube Goldberg machine.
Sid and his friends make a plan and use simple machines like wheels, inclined planes, levers and pulleys to get the panda all the way to the top of the slide
Take an inclined plane and wrap it around a cylinder, and you've got yourself a screw.
When compared to inclined planes, the drive tapes were less complex in design, and offered a significant advantage in space and weight.
They showed the inclined planes going from one side of the frame to the other with nothing anchoring or connecting the planes to the frame.
These enormous shafts of solid granite weighed almost as much as a Boeing 747 jet, yet with tools no more complex than ropes and stones, levers and inclined planes, Egyptians engineers managed to erect them.
and inclined planes can often be made from materials at hand, some simple tools aren't quite that simple.
We can ride either of two inclined planes to dinner atop Mt.
Upgoing trains were drawn by horses for most of its length, except on inclined planes which were redesigned by Robert Stephenson with waterwheels to provide the power," writes Keith Thomas.
This is because the structurally clamped system permits any combination of vertical and inclined planes, together with the integration of different types of vents, creating a seamless facade.
Onboard functions include measurement of lines, arcs, vertical and inclined planes.
John Lowdon and Henry Williams each received pounds 50 for their idea and it was money remarkably well spent for their inclined planes worked without a hitch for 120 years.