inclined plane

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Related to Inclined planes: Simple Machines

inclined plane,

simple machinemachine,
arrangement of moving and stationary mechanical parts used to perform some useful work or to provide transportation. From a historical perspective, many of the first machines were the result of human efforts to improve war-making capabilities; the term engineer
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, consisting of a sloping surface, whose purpose is to reduce the force that must be applied to raise a load. To raise a body vertically a force must be applied that is equal to the weight of the body, i.e., the product of its mass and the acceleration of gravity. The amount of work done (i.e., energy expended) in raising the body is equal to its weight times the distance through which it is raised. By means of an inclined plane a force smaller than the weight of the body can be exerted over a distance greater than the direct vertical distance, doing work equal to the product of the force and the distance through which it acts. If friction is ignored, the work done using the inclined plane will be exactly equal to the work done in lifting the body directly. In any real system some work is done to overcome friction between the plane and the load. The actual mechanical advantage of an inclined plane is the ratio of the load lifted to the force applied; ideally it is equal to the ratio of the length of the sloping plane to its vertical rise. An inclined plane whose sloping length is 5 m and whose vertical rise is 1 m has a mechanical advantage of 5; a 300-newton load can be moved up such a plane by a 60-newton force. The inclined plane has been modified in many ways. The screw and wedge are applications of the principle of the inclined plane but do not require that the load be moved vertically for their successful operation. The chisel, carpenter's plane, auger bit, and ax are some of the many tools based on this principle. Switchbacks on mountain roads are inclined planes that reduce the effort of an automobile engine but increase the distance a car must travel to ascend the mountain.

inclined plane

[′in‚klīnd ′plān]
(mechanics)
A plane surface at an angle to some force or reference line.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the pozterior teeth region of the denture, a zyztem of inclined planes were included between the upper and lower dentures.
The most obvious connection can be found in the inclined plane experiment described in Galileo's Two New Sciences.
The inclined plane, depending on the angle of the irradiating face and the time of day, receives more radiation than the horizontal plane (SEME; STUMBERGER, 2011), with maximum gain of approximately 30% (SCOLAR et al.
ART: You can use the six types of simple machines--levers, pulleys, screws, inclined planes, wheels and axles, and wedges--to make your own Rube Goldberg machine.
Take an inclined plane and wrap it around a cylinder, and you've got yourself a screw.
The steel drive tapes were chosen above cables and inclined planes.
Among them are Galileo's experiment with inclined planes that established a mathematical formula for accelerated motion, Isaac Newton's unraveling of the nature of light and color, and Thomas Young's two-slit experiment that revealed the wavelike character of light.
They both rejected the Aristotelian theory that the medium is the cause of projectile motion and considered the speeds of bodies falling along inclined planes and arcs of circles.
As the engineers looked at methods for automatic positioning of the upper platen, three alternative techniques were considered: cables, inclined planes and steel belts.
They showed the inclined planes going from one side of the frame to the other with nothing anchoring or connecting the planes to the frame.
Girders and two inclined planes of cables support the bridge's main span.