Indian


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Indian

1. a native, citizen, or inhabitant of the Republic of India
2. an American Indian
3. any of the languages of the American Indians

Indian

(Buddhist) architecture (300 B.C.–320 A.D.)
1.
The earliest surviving buildings are of timber and mud-brick construction, of which the stupa is the most characteristic; it is a hemispherical mound with a processional path around the perimeter and elaborately carved gateways. The most typical is the stupa at Sanchi. In rock-cut Buddhist temples, the main forms and details follow early wooden prototypes, with elaborately carved stone shrines in which the exterior is more important than the interior.
2.
All types of temples in this style consist of a small unlit shrine crowned by a spire and preceded by one or more porch-like halls, used for religious dancing and music. The stone was laid up rough-cut and carved in place by Hindu sculptors who treated every element on every surface as unique, using the repetition of sculptural forms to achieve a unifying context. There was no attempt to evolve a style or to perfect any particular pillar or column.
3.
The Hindu and Buddhist religions had a strong influence on Far East temple architecture. One of the most well known and representative sites is Angkor Wat located in Cambodia, a temple complex of shrines that was intended as a funerary monument. It is perhaps one of the world’s largest religious structures and was conceived as a “temple mountain” within an enormous enclosure and surrounded by a wide moat. A monumental causeway, framed by giant mythical serpents, leads to the entrance gate. The temple is built on a series of stepped terraces, surrounded by towers at each corner. Vaulted galleries receive light from an open colonnade illuminating the continuous relief friezes which adorn the inner walls. The central sanctuary is a large pagoda-like tower on top of a stepped pyramid. It is joined by passageways to towers at each of the four corners at the base.
4.
An architecture in which temples are enclosed shrines preceded by an open porch, which is often elaborately carved. They have a lighter appearance and are more elegant than Hindu temples.

Indian

[′in·dē·ən]
(astronomy)
References in classic literature ?
He established schools among them and taught many of the Indians how to read.
A winter camp in the wilderness Medley of trappers, hunters, and Indians Scarcity of game New arrangements in the camp Detachments sent to a distance Carelessness of the Indians when encamped Sickness among the Indians Excellent character of the Nez Perces The Captain's effort as a pacificator A Nez Perce's argument in favor of war Robberies, by the Black feet Long suffering of the Nez Perces A hunter's Elysium among the mountains More robberies The Captain preaches up a crusade The effect upon his hearers.
The Indians, he says, were friendly in their dispositions, and honest to the most scrupulous degree in their intercourse with the white men.
This promising beginning was soon overcast with a cloud of adversity; for upon the tenth day of October, the rear of our company was attacked by a number of Indians, who killed six, and wounded one man.
side of Kentucke River, from the Cherokee Indians, to attend their treaty at Wataga, in March, 1775, to negotiate with them, and, mention the boundaries of the purchase.
The Indian said, "Is it on the road to this house, and on no other, that the English gentleman will travel to-day?
The Indian put a second question--after waiting a little first.
Many Indians of pure blood reside here: the tribe of the Cacique Lucanee constantly have their Toldos [2] on the outskirts of the town.
I never guessed from his mere outside how valuable an animal he was," he remarked to the Indian, "and I am grateful to you for having shown me my error," said he.
The Canadian traders, for a long time, had troublesome competitors in the British merchants of New York, who inveigled the Indian hunters and the coureurs des bois to their posts, and traded with them on more favorable terms.
I mean that this Indian comes just in the nick of time.
While writing this book, fully a quarter of a century since, it occurred to us that the French name of this lake was too complicated, the American too commonplace, and the Indian too unpronounceable, for either to be used familiarly in a work of fiction.

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