Indian

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Indian

1. a native, citizen, or inhabitant of the Republic of India
2. an American Indian
3. any of the languages of the American Indians

Indian

(Buddhist) architecture (300 B.C.–320 A.D.)
1.
The earliest surviving buildings are of timber and mud-brick construction, of which the stupa is the most characteristic; it is a hemispherical mound with a processional path around the perimeter and elaborately carved gateways. The most typical is the stupa at Sanchi. In rock-cut Buddhist temples, the main forms and details follow early wooden prototypes, with elaborately carved stone shrines in which the exterior is more important than the interior.
2.
All types of temples in this style consist of a small unlit shrine crowned by a spire and preceded by one or more porch-like halls, used for religious dancing and music. The stone was laid up rough-cut and carved in place by Hindu sculptors who treated every element on every surface as unique, using the repetition of sculptural forms to achieve a unifying context. There was no attempt to evolve a style or to perfect any particular pillar or column.
3.
The Hindu and Buddhist religions had a strong influence on Far East temple architecture. One of the most well known and representative sites is Angkor Wat located in Cambodia, a temple complex of shrines that was intended as a funerary monument. It is perhaps one of the world’s largest religious structures and was conceived as a “temple mountain” within an enormous enclosure and surrounded by a wide moat. A monumental causeway, framed by giant mythical serpents, leads to the entrance gate. The temple is built on a series of stepped terraces, surrounded by towers at each corner. Vaulted galleries receive light from an open colonnade illuminating the continuous relief friezes which adorn the inner walls. The central sanctuary is a large pagoda-like tower on top of a stepped pyramid. It is joined by passageways to towers at each of the four corners at the base.
4.
An architecture in which temples are enclosed shrines preceded by an open porch, which is often elaborately carved. They have a lighter appearance and are more elegant than Hindu temples.

Indian

[′in·dē·ən]
(astronomy)
References in classic literature ?
Looking over an ancient map, it was ascertained that a tribe of Indians, called "Les Horicans" by the French, existed in the neighborhood of this beautiful sheet of water.
Still there is so much obscurity in the Indian traditions, and so much confusion in the Indian names, as to render some explanation useful.
In the decline of the day, near Kentucke river, as we ascended the brow of a small hill, a number of Indians rushed out of a thick cane-brake upon us, and made us prisoners.
The locomotive, guided by an English engineer and fed with English coal, threw out its smoke upon cotton, coffee, nutmeg, clove, and pepper plantations, while the steam curled in spirals around groups of palm-trees, in the midst of which were seen picturesque bungalows, viharis (sort of abandoned monasteries), and marvellous temples enriched by the exhaustless ornamentation of Indian architecture.
So earnestly did he labor for their conversion that he has always been called the apostle to the Indians.
Being liberated, he engaged with the Spaniards and Sioux Indians in a war against the Pawnees; then returned to Missouri, and had acted by turns as sheriff, trader, trapper, until he was enlisted as a leader by Captain Bonneville.
As the valuable furs soon became scarce in the neighborhood of the settlements, the Indians of the vicinity were stimulated to take a wider range in their hunting expeditions; they were generally accompanied on these expeditions by some of the traders or their dependents, who shared in the toils and perils of the chase, and at the same time made themselves acquainted with the best hunting and trapping grounds, and with the remote tribes, whom they encouraged to bring their peltries to the settlements.
The Indians, in the Indian Territory, owned a large number of slaves during the days of slavery.
The Indians were Araucanians from the south of Chile; several hundreds in number, and highly disciplined.
The Indians, as I saw on looking closer, had small hand-drums slung in front of them.
Sire," returned the Indian, "it is not of his outward form that I would speak, but of the use that I can make of him.
A strayed Indian from Lake Le Barge was willing to take his place; but Kama was obdurate.