Indian

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Indian

1. a native, citizen, or inhabitant of the Republic of India
2. an American Indian
3. any of the languages of the American Indians

Indian

(Buddhist) architecture (300 B.C.–320 A.D.)
1.
The earliest surviving buildings are of timber and mud-brick construction, of which the stupa is the most characteristic; it is a hemispherical mound with a processional path around the perimeter and elaborately carved gateways. The most typical is the stupa at Sanchi. In rock-cut Buddhist temples, the main forms and details follow early wooden prototypes, with elaborately carved stone shrines in which the exterior is more important than the interior.
2.
All types of temples in this style consist of a small unlit shrine crowned by a spire and preceded by one or more porch-like halls, used for religious dancing and music. The stone was laid up rough-cut and carved in place by Hindu sculptors who treated every element on every surface as unique, using the repetition of sculptural forms to achieve a unifying context. There was no attempt to evolve a style or to perfect any particular pillar or column.
3.
The Hindu and Buddhist religions had a strong influence on Far East temple architecture. One of the most well known and representative sites is Angkor Wat located in Cambodia, a temple complex of shrines that was intended as a funerary monument. It is perhaps one of the world’s largest religious structures and was conceived as a “temple mountain” within an enormous enclosure and surrounded by a wide moat. A monumental causeway, framed by giant mythical serpents, leads to the entrance gate. The temple is built on a series of stepped terraces, surrounded by towers at each corner. Vaulted galleries receive light from an open colonnade illuminating the continuous relief friezes which adorn the inner walls. The central sanctuary is a large pagoda-like tower on top of a stepped pyramid. It is joined by passageways to towers at each of the four corners at the base.
4.
An architecture in which temples are enclosed shrines preceded by an open porch, which is often elaborately carved. They have a lighter appearance and are more elegant than Hindu temples.

Indian

[′in·dē·ən]
(astronomy)
References in classic literature ?
They felt no faith in the success of any such attempts, because they had no love for the poor Indians.
He established schools among them and taught many of the Indians how to read.
A familiar intercourse of some standing with the Pierced-nose and Flathead Indians had now convinced Captain Bonneville of their amicable and inoffensive character; he began to take a strong interest in them, and conceived the idea of becoming a pacificator, and healing the deadly feud between them and the Blackfeet, in which they were so deplorably the sufferers.
Accordingly, on the 9th of December, they struck their tents, and moved forward by short stages, as many of the Indians were yet feeble from the late malady.
On the twenty-fourth day of December following we had one man killed, and one wounded, by the Indians, who seemed determined to persecute us for erecting this fortification.
The same day on which this attempt was made, the Indians divided themselves into different parties, and attacked several forts, which were shortly before this time erected, doing a great deal of mischief.
I accordingly informed the Indian that the lady of the house was out; and I warned him and his party off the premises.
Shortly after passing the first spring we came in sight of a famous tree, which the Indians reverence as the altar of Walleechu.
The pious missionaries employed by the Roman Catholic Church to convert the Indians, did everything in their power to counteract the profligacy caused and propagated by these men in the heart of the wilderness.
He may be useful in guiding us to that Indian village Jacinto told us of.
In this, perhaps, he does no more than any other energetic and imaginative race would do, being compelled to set bounds to fancy by experience; but the North American Indian clothes his ideas in a dress which is different from that of the African, and is oriental in itself.
The words were hardly out of the king's mouth when the Indian turned a screw placed in the horse's neck, close to the saddle, and the animal bounded like lightning up into the air, and was soon beyond the sight even of the sharpest eyes.