Indigenismo

Indigenismo

 

(Indianismo), a tendency in the social thought, fine arts, and literature of the countries in Latin America in which Indians constitute a significant part of the population and the tradition of their ancient culture has been preserved. It developed in the 1920’s and 1930’s when many artists and writers, under the influence of the growing working-class and peasant movement, turned to depicting the life of the Indians. Peruvian Indigenists in painting (J. Sabogal, K. Bias, J. Codesido, and J. Vinatea Reinoso), relying on the tradition of folk art, created poetic images of Indian life. Indigenists in literature from Peru (E. López Albújar, C. Alegria, and J. M. Argüedas), Bolivia (A. Argüedas and M. Mendosa Lopez), and Ecuador (F. Chavez and J. Icaza) wrote a number of novels depicting the tragic condition of the Indians and their struggle for their rights. The themes of working life of the Indians and their struggle for liberation play an important role in Mexican painting (D. Rivera and F. Goitia) and literature (E. Abrey Gomez and G. López y Fuentes).

REFERENCES

Kuteishchikova, V. N. Roman Latinskoi Ameriki v XX veke. Moscow, 1964.
Polevoi, V. M. Iskusstvo stran Latinskoi Ameriki. Moscow, 1967.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the early stages of cultural indigenismo, nationalism and Colombia's real preoccupation with its borders were intrinsic to its interest in the indigenous population.
The first period, 1900-1906, was based on Mexican liberalism, nationalism and indigenismo.
It has been noted that, until very recently, indigenismo has played a very important part in the structuring of the Mexican state and in the definition of citizenship in that country (Oehmichen Bazan 1999).
Indeed, she reveals that interculturalism--that is, relations of mutual respect among different cultural groups--is not an indigenous project in Peru, but rather a state-led mestizo initiative that bears many of the legacies of mid-20th-century indigenismo and that fails to understand the daily realities of Quechua peasants.
For de la Cadena the analysis of indigenismo and its reformulation in everyday life sheds a critical light on Peruvian race relations today.
Indigenismo in Clorinda Matto de Turner's Aves sin nido and Jose Icaza's Huasipungo.
Jonathan Okamura looks at the "privileging of multiculturalism" and the resurgence of indigenismo in Hawaii, arguing that despite the rhetoric of equal opportunity, society remains dominated by Haoles.
It is at odds with the government's approach for most of the past 40 years, known as indigenismo, which advocates respect for native traditions, but sees assimilation as the ultimate goal.
Escajadillo, and Mirko Lauer discuss whether Rivera Martinez continues or subverts the Peruvian tradition of indigenismo and/or neo-indigenismo.
A truly brilliant generation which breaks with the Latin American art of the past, with indigenismo, with social content in art and the muralists of all of Latin America.
Guillermo de la Pena's chapter suggests that the ground between official indigenismo and its critics was bumpier than it has often been portrayed.