statistical inference

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statistical inference

[stə′tis·tə·kəl ′in·frəns]
(statistics)
The process of reaching conclusions concerning a population upon the basis of random samplings.

statistical inference

see PROBABILITY, STATISTICS.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is the premise of this article that inferential statistics was never appropriate for general appraisal work but doubly so today as complete data sets are available in most developed areas.
Inferential statistics for frequencies of post operative nausea, vomiting and need for anti-emetics are shown in Table 2.
Lastly, Descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, frequency tables, ANOVA analysis, T-test, Pearson correlation analysis are used to analyse the data.
While the study does have sufficient numbers to support the use of inferential statistics, it was under-powered to detect between-group differences such as the comparisons for men and women, level of training, specialty and working environment.
If data were collected before and after the intervention, the appropriate inferential statistics were not complete.
The focus on the teaching of statistical inference at the graduate level is relevant as the concepts and methods of Inferential Statistics play a vital role in designing and interpreting empirical results in any scientific discipline.
He laments that introductory statistical texts increasingly emphasize inferential statistics to the exclusion of descriptive statistics, the traditional domain of social scientists.
Data were analyzed using an interpretive approach, using descriptive and inferential statistics to analyze the quantitative data.
Chapter 8-12 cover topics on descriptive and inferential statistics which are taught to MBA students as part of the core paper on Business Statistics.
Apart from descriptive statistics to represent the data, the author also uses inferential statistics to model causes and effects of migration.
The evolution of accounting standards, risk management and inferential statistics have collided--with a profound effect on our lives that's shaping policy, regulation, management systems and technology.
However, the series of small yet significant issues with the inferential statistics, as in the foregoing examples, gives the reader less confidence in conclusions drawn using inferential statistical techniques.