InfoWindow

InfoWindow

An earlier trade name for IBM display screens.
References in periodicals archive ?
The program runs on the IBM Infowindow system, with a personal computer interfaced to the videodisc player and controlled by the student using the touch screen on the computer.
The networked classrooms use numerous printers along with a total of 37 IBM PS/2s and 37 Mac SEs, while the drop-in labs have a total of six CAD workstations, eight Mac SEs, 60 IBM PS/2s and six IBM InfoWindow interactive videodisc systems used for multimedia training.
IBM in its Atlanta multimedia operation emphasized the PS/2 for analog and digital video, still pictures and digital audio, and announced its support of independent software providers for each element, including the InfoWindow authoring system for interactive video-disc, M Motion Video Adapter to digitize analog video and produce interactive video, and the Intel Action Media DVI board set.
Since '86, IBM has been marketing the Infowindow system, a touchscreen-controlled computer and video disk combination.
The content will be delivered through Download Demon's InfoWindow - an HTML-based 500 x 300 pixel window that appears while a download is in progress.
In 1986 IBM announced the InfoWindow display, which mixed video and computer graphics on a touch-sensitive screen; and in 1989 they announced the M-Motion adapter, which eliminated the need for a special monitor and replaced touch with a mouse interface.
IBM's commitment to multimedia dates from the early 1980s, when it began development of the pioneering InfoWindow platform.
44MB floppy disk drive, a 40- or 1000MB hard drive, 640K RAM, 256K video RAM, MS-DOS with IBM Infowindow emulation software and a 13" Sony Multiscan monitor.
It also supports courseware titles designed for IBM's InfoWindow system.
The DOS machines had VGA graphics and the PS/2 used InfoWindow with touch-screen interaction.
2 of its VirtualVideo Producer (VVP) multimedia development package is compatible with IBM InfoWindow hardware.
During the next several months, the chemistry professors involved in the project made a decision to transfer the bulk of their efforts to Macintosh hardware because they felt that its software and graphic capabilities supported their requirements better than did the InfoWindow system.