inhibitory postsynaptic potential

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Related to Inhibitory synapse: Excitatory synapse

inhibitory postsynaptic potential

[in′hib·ə·tȯr·ē pōst·sə′nap·tik pə′ten·chəl]
(neuroscience)
A transient, graded hyperpolarization of the postsynaptic membrane, mediated by a chemical neurotransmitter, in response to action potentials arriving at the endings of the presynaptic neurons.
References in periodicals archive ?
2012) Clustered dynamics of inhibitory synapses and dendritic spines in the adult neocortex.
2012) Elimination of inhibitory synapses is a major component of adult ocular dominance plasticity.
53)) The mAChR-driven eCB-STD is also found at hippocampal excitatory synapses (54)) and striatal inhibitory synapses.
On the other hand, at inhibitory synapses on Purkinje cells, eCB-STD can be induced by intense climbing fiber stimulation (50 pulses at 5Hz).
Numerous asymmetric and symmetric chemical synapses, corresponding to the excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively, were seen in the neuropile region.
Our experiments with the use of a mathematical model of neural network learning on the basis of changes in the effectiveness of excitative and inhibitory synapses yielded satisfactory evidence of this hypothesis (Shulgina, Ponomarev, et al.
At higher doses, the blockage of calcium influx in inhibitory synapses could contribute to the appearance of a toxic convulsive situation, which is aggravated by the interaction with diphenylhydantoin.
Reijmers and his team discovered the increase in perisomatic inhibitory synapses by imaging neurons activated by fear in genetically manipulated mice.
The primary properties of excitatory and inhibitory synapses undergo modification beyond the end of the second postnatal week.
The fluorescent markers allow scientists to see live excitatory and inhibitory synapses for the first time - and, importantly, how they change as new memories are formed.
88) Inhibitory synapses on a Purkinje cell also show synaptic plasticity.
Neuroscientists have now shown that many of these inhibitory synapses disappear if the adult brain is forced to learn new skills.