Injection Laser

injection laser

[in′jek·shən ¦lā·zər]
(optics)
A laser in which a forward-biased gallium arsenide diode converts direct-current input power directly into coherent light, without optical pumping.

Injection Laser

 

a semiconductor laser in which injection of electrons and holes into the region of the p-n junction is used. An injection laser is distinguished in its small size (volume, approximately 1 cu mm). Injection lasers are based on a large number of semiconductor materials; they radiate in a broad range of wavelengths, from visible light to infrared radiation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier, in 1962 Boyle and colleague, Don Nelson, developed the ruby laser in 1962, and with another colleague, David Thomas, he helped to develop the semiconductor injection laser, which is found in many electronic appliances.
The contract, which runs through 2007, comprises a variety of custom-designed mounts optimized to reduce wavefront distortion for the project's Injection Laser System.
The quantum cascade (QC) laser, is a new semiconductor injection laser invented at AT&T Bell Laboratories.
Panish - for conception and development of the first room- temperature continuous-wave semiconductor injection laser with double heterostructure;
Diego Olego, Philips Laboratories blue laser research department head stated, "The joint Cree-Philips effort will push the state of the art of gallium nitride (GaN) material and device technology to implement GaN injection lasers.
First Visible Light Emitting Diode and Semiconductor Injection Lasers
This achievement has opened new areas of semiconductor research and led to the creation of new optoelectronic devices, such as injection lasers, light-emitting diodes and photodetectors used in optical storage and communications devices, and to the development of highly efficient solar cells.
An IEEE Life Fellow, Holonyak is recognized for his career of pioneering contributions to the field of semiconductors, specifically in the areas of semiconductor alloys, heterojunctions, visible light-emitting diodes and injection lasers.
His Nobel Prize-winning work was published in a 1963 paper, "A Proposed Class of Heterojunction Injection Lasers," in the Proceedings of the IEEE.