Innocent IV


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Innocent IV,

d. 1254, pope (1243–54), a Genoese named Sinibaldo Fieschi, a distinguished jurist who studied and later taught law at the Univ. of Bologna; successor of Celestine IV. He was of a noble family. Although he had been regarded as sympathetic to the empire, once pope he quickly took up the papal struggle with Frederick IIFrederick II,
1194–1250, Holy Roman emperor (1220–50) and German king (1212–20), king of Sicily (1197–1250), and king of Jerusalem (1229–50), son of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI and of Constance, heiress of Sicily.
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 and the HohenstaufenHohenstaufen
, German princely family, whose name is derived from the castle of Staufen built in 1077 by a Swabian count, Frederick. In 1079, Frederick married Agnes, daughter of Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV, and was created duke of Swabia.
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. After a futile treaty he felt unsafe in Rome and fled to Lyons, where he convened the Council of Lyons (1245; see Lyons, First Council ofLyons, First Council of
, 1245, 13th ecumenical council of the Roman Catholic Church, convened at Lyons, France, by Pope Innocent IV to deal with his struggle with Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II.
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). Frederick was condemned again and declared deposed, and Innocent supported Henry Raspe and, later, William II of Holland as pretenders to the imperium. He also tried to get an English or French prince to take Sicily as a fief, but Frederick was too strong. Frederick died as the pope was opening a crusade against him (1250). Innocent did not spare the other Hohenstaufen, Conrad IVConrad IV,
1228–54, German king (1237–54), king of Sicily and of Jerusalem (1250–54), son of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II. He was elected (1237) king of the Romans at his father's instigation after Frederick had deposed Conrad's older brother Henry in
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 and ManfredManfred
, c.1232–1266, king of Sicily (1258–66), the last Hohenstaufen on that throne. An illegitimate son of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II, Manfred was regent in Sicily for his brother Conrad IV.
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, but after finding them invincible in Sicily, he recognized ConradinConradin
, 1252–68, duke of Swabia, titular king of Jerusalem and Sicily, the last legitimate Hohenstaufen, son of Holy Roman Emperor Conrad IV. While Conradin was still a child in Germany, his uncle Manfred made himself (1258) king of Sicily.
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 as king of Sicily. Innocent was almost wholly occupied with his quarrel with the Hohenstaufen, and the taxes he levied to continue it made him unpopular with clergy and laity alike. He was succeeded by Alexander IV.

Innocent IV

 

(secular name, Sinibaldo Fieschi). Born circa 1195 in Genoa; died Dec. 7, 1254, in Naples. Pope from 1243.

Innocent IV continued the fierce struggle that had flared up during the papacy of Gregory IX against the German emperor Frederick II Hohenstaufen. In 1245 he convoked an ecumenical council in Lyon which deposed Frederick II. Innocent supported the Italian cities in their fight for independence from the emperor; he advanced two candidates to replace Frederick II on the German throne— in 1246, Henry Raspe, the landgrave of Thuringia, and in 1247, William II, the Count of Holland [Emperor William of Holland]. After the death of Frederick II (1250), Innocent IV fought against his successor, Conrad IV. He actively supported the Teutonic Order’s piratical policy in Eastern Europe. In 1245 he sent Piano Carpini on a diplomatic mission to the great khan of the Mongols.

Innocent IV

original name Sinibaldo de' Fieschi. died 1254, pope (1243--54); an unrelenting enemy of Emperor Frederick II and his heirs
References in periodicals archive ?
Convinced by Jewish leaders that such condemnation violated the principles of Christianity, however, Pope Innocent IV overturned the jury's findings.
As Pope Innocent IV sagely remarked back in the 13th century, people whom the public deem holy might in private be living less than edifying lives.
Writing at roughly the same time as Hostienis, his fellow canonist Sinibaldo de Fiesco (circa 1180-1254), better known as Pope Innocent IV, wrote an important decretal gloss, "On the Restitution of Spoils" (45) that articulated a new technical definition of war.
In April 1245, after an inquiry, Pope Innocent IV reversed his decision to recognise the prince as his vassal.
Dafydd ap Llywelyn created continental alliances - with King Louis IX of France and with Pope Innocent IV - which, at one time, looked like confirming Wales' independence as a state under the Pope's protection.
In a letter dated 1246 from Grand Khan Guyuk to Pope Innocent IV, Genghis Khan's grandson orders the pontiff to travel to central Asia in person - with all of his "kings" in tow - to "pay service and homage to us" as an act of "submission", threatening that otherwise: "you shall be our enemy".
Until an official of Duke Swietopelk came riding by, and heard the prisoner chanting Latin psalms, then returned to the village with an escort and freed Bishop Sedenza, who ten years earlier had sailed as a legate of Pope Innocent IV to the Danish king Eric, and during a storm had ended up in Hel, in other words in hell.
In a forthcoming publication I intend to argue that the famous attack on the abbesses of the Cistercian Order in the diocese of Burgos and Palencia (usually identified as those of las Huelgas), which has been famously attributed to Innocent III and then "reiterated" by Innocent IV (as Macy describes it on p.
So we have, for example, the fresco of an Obizzi lieutenant general of Tuscany, of an Obizzi fighting the Infidels, of an Obizzi embarking in Ancona for a trip to the Holy Land, of an Obizzi liberating Pope Innocent IV from the besieging army of Frederick II, of an Obizzi receiving the keys of Lucca as a compensation for having driven out the imperial army, of an Obizzi sent as a Pope's emissary to England, of an Obizzi governor general of Flanders, and so on.
Knowing that formal papal approval was the only way her Rule could survive through the ages, Clare pressed Pope Innocent IV until he acquiesed.
Ultimately, Pope Innocent IV would officially approve the Rule of Saint Clare, allowing its adherents to fully realize Clare's privilege of poverty.
Third, there is the fact that even in contracts for sale, it is not permissible to sell for more than it is here or now worth unless the seller was intending to preserve it up to that time, as is found in the chapter Naviganti, Extra, on usury, (4) or was intending to transport it to that place, as Raymundus says, (5) Innocent IV, (6) John Andreae, (7) and John Calderinus.