intermolecular force

(redirected from Intermolecular attraction)

intermolecular force

[‚in·tər·mə′lek·yə·lər ′fōrs]
(physical chemistry)
The force between two molecules; it is that negative gradient of the potential energy between the interacting molecules, if energy is a function of the distance between the centers of the molecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Polyurethane has a phase-separated structure due to the difference in intermolecular attraction of its hard and soft segments.
The FTIR spectra have been studied to analyze intermolecular attractions such as extent of hydrogen bonding, dipole-dipole interaction along with the confirmation of polyurethane formation.
Other compatible modifying polyolefins can control molecular weight and molecular weight distribution, can affect the intermolecular attraction, can lead to entanglements, can be involved in intermolecular reactions, such as crosslinks.
The intermolecular attraction associated with the polar nitrile group in acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber resists rotational motion.
Therefore, the lower damping value means the more rigid molecular chain and the lower intermolecular attraction force.
Each demonstration is followed by a chapter containing a simple explanation of such chemical principles as intermolecular attractions and bonds, the behavior of gases, and the differences between acids and bases.
Some weak intermolecular attractions, called hydrogen bonds, which ordinarily would strengthen links between the glucose components of alpha-cyclodextrine become disrupted.
Intermolecular attractions between a surface and the tips of those plentiful hairs, or setules, on geckos, spiders, and other creatures add up to a strong adhesive force (SN: 6/7/03, p.
In a liquid film thinner than about 100 nm, intermolecular attractions called van der Waals forces tend to squeeze the film so much that it disappears with a pop, says Dorbolo.
Each seta's tip branches into even finer hairs that nestle so closely with every surface the gecko touches that intermolecular attractions called van der Waals bonds and capillary forces kick in.

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