intermolecular force

(redirected from Intermolecular bond)

intermolecular force

[‚in·tər·mə′lek·yə·lər ′fōrs]
(physical chemistry)
The force between two molecules; it is that negative gradient of the potential energy between the interacting molecules, if energy is a function of the distance between the centers of the molecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lack of any strong intermolecular bond functionality means that the molecular packing in chlorothalonil is controlled primarily by weak C[equivalent to]N .
From this study one may conclude that the strength of intermolecular bond formed between the ortho and para substitute of aniline and 1-octanol is shown that the tendency of complex formation is relatively more in para substitute than that of ortho substitute of anilines.
2+] to DNA to explain why the swelling experiments show this ligand as increasing the intermolecular bond strength between the DNA double helices, while netropsin decreases this degree of stabilization.
What we're doing is trying to unravel how to do synthetic chemistry of intermolecular bonds," she says.
Intermolecular bonds (mostly hydrogen bonds), which form during the freezing/thawing process of PVA water solutions, act as efficient cross-links [9].
Ette uses weak intermolecular bonds called hydrogen bonds to coax two kinds of chemicals into novel solid materials by forcing them to crystallized together.
The fragility index varies from m = 16 (for very strong glass-forming liquids like those formed by high-directional bond molecules (3)) to m = 250 (for very fragile glass-forming liquids for which the interatomic or intermolecular bonds are nondirectional (4), (5)).
When EVOH serves as the major component, it crystallizes rapidly due to the strong self-associated hydrogen bonds occurring between the hydroxyl groups, considered dominant in comparison to the intermolecular bonds.
EZ Flow works to alter intermolecular bonds and all of its ingredients are sourced from oil and gas reservoirs.
The increase in the amount of free radicals will provide for a better interaction with the surface of stone materials, and may also contribute to the formation of intermolecular bonds.
This quantifies the disruption of intermolecular bonds that occur when a surface is created.

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