Internet Addiction Test


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Internet Addiction Test

A psychological test that determines the degree of addiction a person has using the Internet. Developed by Dr. Kimberly Young in 1998, a result from 80 to 100 points means Internet usage is causing significant problems in life. A 50-79 score means occasional problems, and 31 to 49 means a mild level of addiction. Less than 31 is normal usage. See Internet addiction.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the requirement of the study, for the measurement of both variables internet addiction and social support, Internet addiction Test (Young, K, 1996) and Perceived scale Social Support (Zamet et al 1988) were used.
The psychometric properties of the internet addiction test.
Students were given the consent form, questionnaire for Socio-demographic details, Internet addiction test (IAT), SRQ 20.
A modified version of the 20item Internet addiction test developed by Young (1996) was used to assess Internet addiction.
Young (1998a; 1998b) developed two IA assessment tools: The Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the Internet Addiction Diagnostic Questionnaire (IADQ).
The study also noted more than 25% of those who took the Internet Addiction Test indicated they used the internet so much that they had a mild - or worse - problem in terms of the internet interfering with their lives, commonly called internet addiction.
A meta-analysis of the reliability of Young's Internet Addiction Test.
In this way, the items' sensitivity to minor estimation differences between participants was increased, while also enabling the response format to be in line with Young's Internet Addiction Test (1998).
Caption: None of the 248 study participants met the criteria for Internet addiction as defined by an Internet Addiction Test score of 80 or higher.
A 20-item Internet Addiction Test (IAT) developed by Young (1998) was used where each item is measured using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = Never; 5 = Very Frequently).