web browser

(redirected from Internet browser)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.
Related to Internet browser: Internet Explorer, opera, Maxthon

Web browser

[′web ‚brau̇z·ər]
(computer science)

web browser

(World-Wide Web)

Web browser

The application program that serves as the primary method for accessing the World Wide Web, one of the major services on the Internet. In order to view a website, its address (URL), such as www.computerlanguage.com, is typed into the search box at the top of the browser, and the site's home page is retrieved. The home page includes an index to other pages on the site as well as to pages on other sites, and those pages are retrieved by clicking "links" (see hypertext).

All browsers include bookmarks (Favorites) that store the addresses (URLs) of frequently used pages. Tabs are another useful feature that keep multiple Web pages open for quick access (see tabbed browsing).

IE, Firefox, Chrome, Safari and Opera
The most popular Web browsers are Internet Explorer (IE), Firefox, Chrome, Safari and Opera. All browsers are free, and except for IE, which is Windows-only, they run on both Windows and Mac. Some browsers also run under Linux.

All browsers offer similar features, no matter which computer they run on. The way users interact with a Web page has more to do with the page than the browser. Web pages contain embedded programs that turn them into applications not much different than the software users install in their own computers.

Web Browser History
The Mosaic browser put the Web on the map in 1993, but by the mid-1990s, Netscape Navigator had 80% of the market. Vying for top spot, Netscape and Internet Explorer (IE) constantly added features that fragmented websites into competing camps. In the early days, one often found sites with notices such as "Best Viewed in Netscape" or "Best Viewed in Internet Explorer." IE eventually trumped Netscape, but over the years lost market share to competing browsers. See World Wide Web, Mosaic, Internet Explorer, Opera, Firefox, Mozilla, Safari, Chrome browser, hyperlink, HTML and microbrowser.


Not Much of a Difference
At first glance, Internet Explorer for Windows (top) and Firefox on the Mac (bottom) look identical. Although the placement of menus and icons differ, all browsers provide similar functions. When one browser adds a unique feature, the others follow in time. Users interact with the Web page and its embedded JavaScript code, which is the same no matter which browser or computer environment is used. See platform.



Not Much of a Difference
At first glance, Internet Explorer for Windows (top) and Firefox on the Mac (bottom) look identical. Although the placement of menus and icons differ, all browsers provide similar functions. When one browser adds a unique feature, the others follow in time. Users interact with the Web page and its embedded JavaScript code, which is the same no matter which browser or computer environment is used. See platform.
References in periodicals archive ?
com), the Internet browser boasts colorful, fun graphics while offering the functionality of Internet Explorer from Microsoft.
June 23, 1998: A three-judge federal appeals panel removes restrictions that Jackson imposed on Windows 95, saying there was adequate justification to bundle the Internet browser in Windows.
The federal government and 13 states' attorneys general are investigating whether Microsoft illegally used its marketplace power to limit competition, especially among Internet browsers, the software used to view information on the World Wide Web.
In his decision, Jackson argued that forcing Microsoft not to bundle the Internet browser with the Windows 95 ``will not cause a significant hardship'' for the company since it already sells the product separately.

Full browser ?