Interpenetrate


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Interpenetrate

A decorative feature, such as a molding, that enters another element, such as a column, and reappears on the other side; it was commonly found in the Gothic Revival style.
References in periodicals archive ?
A balanced profile is obtained when the adjacent polymers interpenetrate equally, while an unbalanced profile is obtained when one polymer interdiffuses to a greater extent than the other does.
But the interpretation of Joo's work lies not so much in the identification of such dichotomies as in understanding how these seemingly opposed terms interpenetrate each other to the point where they become inextricable, placing the viewer in a state of suspension.
Nan Shepherd, an author and poet who spent her life walking in the Cairngorms, said that place and mind may interpenetrate until the nature of both are altered.
In the gleaming white expanse of vertical lozenges, Morning (1965), structure and ground interpenetrate.
Altoon had by the mid-'60s seized the airbrush to produce works that brought line and color together, even if, as in the above example, they touch rather than fully interpenetrate.
Paganism is consequently a blurred and shifting designation, defying taxonomy for, as Jones relates, Christianity and paganism could interpenetrate.
But London is the central theme that runs through the diary: the city as a presence that both gives out wonder and demands some sacrifices and accommodations in return; this is a story of people and the city, and the ways in which they interpenetrate and change each other.
They will interpenetrate and the interconnection will be tighter with globalization, which provides a golden opportunity for marketing promotion.
How do the secular and the sacred interpenetrate in literature?
Babies are born to interpenetrate with their mothers, to learn from them and to begin to build models in their heads of how to understand reality and to relate to others.