Intersex

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intersex

[′in·tər‚seks]
(physiology)
An individual who is intermediate in sexual constitution between male and female.

Intersex

 

an organism that to some degree possesses characteristics of both sexes simultaneously.

An intersex should be distinguished from a gynandromorph, in which the characteristics of the different sexes are distributed mosaically, that is, in various parts of the body. In contrast to normally functioning bisexual organisms, sexual function in an intersex is usually underdeveloped.

References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the topics included: anti-male-male contact mores in Kansas swingers clubs, standards of care in local hospitals for intersexed infants, and gay adoption.
In a subsequent book, Lessons From the Intersexed (1998), she concluded that the lesson from ending intersex surgery and instead allowing genital ambiguity to remain unaltered would be the dissolution of gender itself.
marginalization, overt/systemic racism, testifying, internalized oppression/hatred, accomodationist, sexuality/gender/ sex, sexual orientation, hermaphroditic, intersexed, homo-, hetero-, bi-, -sexual, trans-, -vestite, -sexual, -gender, homogeneity, heterosexism/normativity, homophobia, symbolic inversion.
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersexed, and queer/questioning (LGBTIQ) individuals, collectively known as sexual minorities, represent approximately 10% of the population.
Grace and Kristopher Wells of the University of Alberta to empower lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-identified, intersexed, queer, questioning and two-spirited youth.
Kessler, Lessons from the Intersexed (New Brunswick, N.
Holmes offers an experiential narrative of living in the intersexed body, while MacDonald reads questions of gender and sexuality through a frame of transgender politics.
In addition, yes, we have read reports of intersexed fish but must say we find bass to be among the least credible species of the fish group.
The insight that various deviations from gender "normality"--such as drag, transsexual surgery, demands by intersexed people for gender reassignment, etc.
These authors present poignant case studies describing the experience of intersexed and transgendered people that highlight how gender identity and biological sex do not necessarily coincide nor are they always static and completely definable.