Intestinal Nematodes

Intestinal Nematodes

 

(Russian geogel’minty, “geohelminths”), a group of parasitic worms found in man and animals, which develop (in contrast to biohelminths) without intermediate hosts. The eggs enter the soil with excrement, where they develop to the larval stage in warm weather. Human infestation occurs either through eating unwashed fruit and vegetables, through unwashed hands that have eggs on them (for example, ascarids, whipworm, and pinworms), or through direct contact with the earth where the larvae are living (such as ancylostomes).

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Most intestinal nematodes like Ascaris and Trichuris are acquired by ingestion of infective eggs from soil contaminated with human faeces containing eggs.
The global burden of intestinal nematode infections-fifty years on.
In Cambodia, humans are commonly infected with intestinal nematodes and protozoa, including hookworms, Strongyloides stercoralis, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Giardia lamblia (6,7).
True (A) or false (B)--fill in only block A or B: Eosinophilia is a common finding in patients infected with intestinal nematodes that have a migratory larval stage.
This compact, glossy, paperbound text contains 62 cases in 5 sections: 1) Intestinal Protozoa, II) Blood and Tissue Protozoa, III) Cestodes, Trematodes and Intestinal Nematodes, IV) Blood and Tissue Nematodes, and V) Challenging Cases.
Short report: do intestinal nematodes increase the risk for multibacillary leprosy?
3]; 3) exclusion of other parasites causing eosinophilia, such as intestinal nematodes, particularly Strongyloides stercoralis (excluded by larval culture and serology by ELISA IgG), Schistosoma sp.
Of the intestinal nematodes, only Trichuris trichiura does not possess the phasmid.
Several recent studies have described the ubiquitous nature of intestinal nematode infections in developing countries.
Test results for enteric pathogens, intestinal nematodes, morbillivirus, and Brucella spp.
The helminths include soil-transmitted intestinal nematodes (roundworms), trematodes (flukes) and cestodes (tapeworms) (Table I).
Control strategies for human intestinal nematode infections.

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