gastrointestinal tract

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Related to Intestinal tract: small intestine

gastrointestinal tract

[¦ga·strō‚in′tes·tən·əl ′trakt]
(anatomy)
The stomach and intestine.
References in periodicals archive ?
is developing polymer-based pharmaceuticals that selectively bind to and eliminate target substances from the intestinal tract.
Scientists now suggest that when pancreatic enzymes leak out of the intestinal tract, they set off the devastating chain reaction known as shock.
Bacteria that normally live in the human intestinal tract appear to be able to order the kinds of foods they want from the cells lining the intestine, a Washington University study has found.
Reflux esophagitis is a common disorder of the upper intestinal tract caused by regurgitation of acid into the esophagus, and is most commonly manifested by heartburn.
Guanilib, also known by its laboratory name SP304, is an orally deliverable compound designed to mimic a naturally-occurring hormone called uroguanylin which is normally produced in the body's intestinal tract.
The combination of Saccharomyces boulardii and MOS (mannan-oligosaccharide) provides enhanced support to the intestinal tract and assists gut immune response against undesirable bacteria.
Ibuprofen can cause mild damage in the stomach and intestinal tract, so it is important to take it with food.
Guanilib is an orally deliverable compound designed to mimic a naturally-occurring hormone called uroguanylin, which is normally produced in the body's intestinal tract.
Elan believes that the mechanisms involved in the absorption of these are a combination of endocytosis in which the nanoparticles are engulfed by certain cells of the intestinal tract and transport across the junctions between cells.
The researchers first obtained a baseline count of the bacteria living in each monkey's mouth and intestinal tract.
Pro-biotic bacteria, termed "Probiotics," are bacteria that naturally exist in the human body and are believed by many to be necessary for intestinal tract health.
Three shell layers made from natural compounds protect the cultures until they reach the intestinal tract where they are then released.