inverse ratio

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inverse ratio

[¦in‚vərs ′rā·shō]
(mathematics)
The reciprocal of the ratio of two quantities. Also known as reciprocal ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
With nanometer design challenges escalating in inverse proportion to shrinking geometries, Virage Logic Corporation continuously delivers high quality semiconductor IP solutions that help reduce overall design costs, boost manufacturing yields and better manage low-power designs.
self-perpetuating oligarchy (borrowed phrase) made up of self-satisfied buffers whose opinion of themselves is in almost perfectly inverse proportion to the opinion held of them by the racing public.
This tendency to talk ourselves down at every opportunity, some sort of perverse jingoism in reverse, is a comparatively recent development which seems to grow in inverse proportion to the evidence of our own eyes.
The 3-point attempts rise and fall in inverse proportion to the Bruins' poise and ball movement.
But their hatred is in inverse proportion to their size.
The rise of Asian-American politics also provides an interesting lesson in how an ethnic group's clout tends to grow in inverse proportion to the hardships it endures.
What Mr Cohen fails to mention is their recorded tendency to produce in inverse proportion to need.
I have a problem with flavour enhancers, the use of which is in inverse proportion to the skill of the chef, and bastardised Chinese food in general is notorious for the misery of MSG.
But in some cases this takes over - Anna Kournikova's modelling success was in inverse proportion to her tennis achievements in the end.
There'll be no-one happier than me if tonight is another encounter to turn your brain to mush; the number one priority is to get out of Stamford Bridge still in the tie, an outcome whose likelihood is in inverse proportion to the excitement in the game.
29 /PRNewswire/ -- An official of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) told a Congressional subcommittee that campaigns for increased public funding of embryonic stem cell research have grown "in inverse proportion to the dwindling hopes of medical benefit, as private funding sources increasingly realize that embryonic stem cell research may not be a wise investment.