inverse-square law

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inverse-square law

[′in‚vərs ¦skwer ‚lȯ]
(physics)
Any law in which a physical quantity varies with distance from a source inversely as the square of that distance.

inverse-square law

inverse-square law
A law which applies to a light source (or to a sound source) that is in a space far away from any reflecting surface: the intensity at a point, as measured on a surface which is perpendicular to a line drawn between the point and the source, varies inversely with the square of the distance between the point and the source. (For sound waves, this decrease in intensity is equivalent to a drop in sound-pressure level of 6 dB for each doubling of distance from the source.)
References in periodicals archive ?
But each has implemented the vertical motion differently, and this accounts for the different functional fall off of signal with distance in the two cases as well as their difference from the inverse square law.
Despite their applicability in appropriate circumstances, both view factor and inverse square law methods have significant limitations, particularly when the geometry is complex.
The alternative of stand-off lamming using a large airframe or highflying UAV runs into two key obstacles: the inverse square law pushes up the size, weight and cost of the jamming package, while the limited survivability of the platforms constrains their effective footprint to less than the radio/radar horizon.
This problem, known as 'the inverse problem', was the problem which Halley had asked him to solve, assuming that the law of force is an inverse square law.
Thus, it is not clear that one can get around the inverse square law in this manner without using up all the available shadow matter.
Lotka (1926) proposed an inverse square law relating authors of scientific articles to the number of articles written by each author.
Scientists raised the idea of a fifth force in 1986 after finding hints that the gravity inside an Australian mine shaft did not follow Newton's inverse square law.
Newton's inverse square law of gravity, when expressed in terms of an acceleration field g(r, t), has the differential form:
Sunlight intensity falls off according to the inverse square law which means that solar panels would produce just one per cent of their power output here on Earth.