inverse-square law

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inverse-square law

[′in‚vərs ¦skwer ‚lȯ]
(physics)
Any law in which a physical quantity varies with distance from a source inversely as the square of that distance.

inverse-square law

inverse-square law
A law which applies to a light source (or to a sound source) that is in a space far away from any reflecting surface: the intensity at a point, as measured on a surface which is perpendicular to a line drawn between the point and the source, varies inversely with the square of the distance between the point and the source. (For sound waves, this decrease in intensity is equivalent to a drop in sound-pressure level of 6 dB for each doubling of distance from the source.)
References in periodicals archive ?
While in some studies Lotka's inverse square law holds (e.
Ander, the investigators tested the inverse square law by comparing actual measurements with values predicted using Newton's law.
For now, physicists are not rushing to amend the inverse square law or declare the existence of a new force.
It is not generally known that Newton first derived his inverse square law of gravitation by first considering circular orbits [7, 8].
The spring type force is also shown to be a special case of the inverse square law for small displacements around an equilibrium point.
In the form (2) Newton's law permits a unique generalisation by adding a term of the same order but which can preserve the inverse square law outside of spherical masses,