Irminger Current


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Irminger Current

[′ər·miŋ·ər ′kə·rənt]
(oceanography)
An ocean current that is one of the terminal branches of the Gulf Stream system, flowing west off the southern coast of Iceland.

Irminger Current

 

a warm current of the Atlantic Ocean off the southern coast of Iceland; western branch of the North Atlantic Current. The Irminger Current moves at a rate of about 1 km/hr. The water temperature ranges from 5° to 7°C in winter and 10° to 12°C in summer. The salinity is 34.8–35 parts per thousand. The current was named after the Danish navigator C. Irminger, who was the first to detect and describe it in 1853–54.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the North Atlantic, the Gulf Stream diverges: The Norwegian Atlantic Current bends east to warm the United Kingdom and Scandinavia, and the smaller North Icelandic Irminger Current veers around the west of Iceland.
One loops back, skirts the southern shore of Iceland and then sweeps southward along the southeast coast of Greenland as the Irminger Current.
Bower and Valdes knew (from prior satellite measurements of sea surface heights, which indicate currents) that eddies pinch off every two months or so from the Irminger Current, a warm current that hugs the west side of Greenland and encircles the northern part of the Labrador Sea.