food irradiation

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food irradiation

[′füd i‚rā·dē¦ā·shən]
(food engineering)
The treatment of fresh or processed foods with ionizing radiation that inactivates biological contaminants (insects, molds, parasites, or bacteria), rendering foods safe to consume and extending their storage lifetime.
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem with approving irradiated food is we simply don't know what the long-term health effects are in consuming the food.
org for more information on retail sales of irradiated food.
He was speaking at the SIAL 2010 Irradiation Seminar yesterday, in which international radiation experts met with food security and nuclear safety officials to discuss the benefits and hazards of irradiated food.
Current regulations require that irradiated food bear the Radura symbol, either at the individual unit level or at point of sale.
And the FDA says there is no reason why irradiated foods shouldn't become the norm.
Cold pasteurized" is just another name the FDA is using for irradiated foods.
This finding reflects the importance of educating the public about the hazards of foodborne pathogens and the potential benefits of consuming irradiated foods," he says.
There is nowhere in the world where a large population has eaten large amounts of irradiated food over a long period of time," says Carol Tucker Foreman, director of the Food Policy Institute at the Consumer Federation of America.
Irradiated meat products still harbor spoilage bacteria, which can multiply; therefore, irradiated food products must be stored with care.
Irradiated food is being illegally sold in the UK despite retailers' claims to the contrary, says a report out today.
The report reveals that the US Army shipped irradiated bacon to troops in Vietnam until the FDA stopped the program after learning that "lab animals fed irradiated food suffered premature death, cancer, reproductive dysfunction and other problems.
A more legitimate concern, she said, is that people may be careless in handling irradiated food -- the pathogens can grow back, she advised, and many even multiply faster because harmless bacteria killed by radiation won't be there to interfere.