food irradiation

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food irradiation

[′füd i‚rā·dē¦ā·shən]
(food engineering)
The treatment of fresh or processed foods with ionizing radiation that inactivates biological contaminants (insects, molds, parasites, or bacteria), rendering foods safe to consume and extending their storage lifetime.
References in periodicals archive ?
Currently, 50 countries accept irradiated food products, including the world's biggest farm product importers.
These variances often result in confusions in the worldwide trade of irradiated foods and hence a reliable and authentic method to identify irradiated products is required all the times [8, 9].
This is vital to an understanding of the difficulties most of these stakeholders and the Japanese government have had with taking a clear stance against irradiated food from the affected areas in the aftermath of the disaster.
Aside from concerns about irradiated food, we need to consider the process itself, which is a high energy user and has environmental hazards.
He was speaking at the SIAL 2010 Irradiation Seminar yesterday, in which international radiation experts met with food security and nuclear safety officials to discuss the benefits and hazards of irradiated food.
Availability of detection methods for irradiated foods would improve standard regulatory procedures.
Current regulations require that irradiated food bear the Radura symbol, either at the individual unit level or at point of sale.
As labeling laws currently stand, any irradiated food must be labeled with a statement such as "treated by irradiation" and must display the irradiation symbol, called a radura.
It is important to say that irradiated food is not radioactive and will not glow in the dark.
In fact, astronauts have been eating irradiated food since the 1970s, increasing its respectability.
Not only that, they are also working on changing the labels on irradiated food so that irradiated food need not be identified as such, instead being mislabeled "pasteurized
Under the proposal, the FDA would require companies to label irradiated food only when the radiation treatment causes changes to the taste, texture, smell, or shelf life.