Parker, Isaac

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Parker, Isaac

(1768–1830) judge; born in Boston, Mass. A goldsmith's son, he graduated from Harvard with high honors in 1786, taught school, then moved to Castine, Maine, where he set up a law practice. He served a term in Congress (1797–99) before accepting an appointment as U.S. marshal for Maine. Named to the Massachusetts Supreme Court in 1806, he became chief justice in 1814, a position he held until his death. He was a steady if unspectacular jurist, and many of his decisions were acknowledged as authoritative in federal and other state courts. In 1817 he drew up a plan for what became Harvard Law School, at which he was a professor and overseer for several years.
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Producer Isaac Parker, creator of The Unsigned Arch, said:"The response we've had to The Unsigned Arch has been amazing.
Music producer Isaac Parker, creator of The Unsigned Arch, said: "We wanted to create a way for the North-east to shout about all the unsigned musical talent we have here and give international exposure to some of the amazing musicians in the region.
True stories of "Hanging Judge" Isaac Parker and fictional stories as depicted in novels like Charles Portis' "True Grit" kept not just the name, but the heritage of Fort Smith alive into the 20th century.
ISAAC Parker was born in May to proud parents Lucie and Carl, who live in Poole, Dorset.
In a bid to tame the town and bring outlaws back to justice in "Injun Territory", hanging judge Isaac Parker rode in with his posse of John Wayne-style marshalls and deputies.
deputy marshal who worked for "Hanging Judge" Isaac Parker on the lawless American frontier.
Music producer Isaac Parker, creator of The Unsigned Arch, said: "We wanted to create a way for the North East to shout about all the unsigned musical talent we have here and give international exposure to some of the amazing musicians in the region.
Even more remarkable was the gang's involvement with iconic real-life western characters, like legendary "Hanging Judge" Isaac Parker and notorious half-black, half-Cherokee outlaw Cherokee Bill.
Police said Isaac Parker, just released from jail, should not be approached and was "a serious threat to women".
Popular Fort Smith National Landmarks include the courtroom and gallows of Judge Isaac Parker, known simply to most as "The Hanging Judge".
Police said Isaac Parker, recently released from prison, was "a serious threat to women" and should not be approached.