Ivanhoe

(redirected from Isaac of York)

Ivanhoe

disinherited by father, Cedric the Saxon. [Br. Lit.: Ivanhoe]

Ivanhoe

the epitome of chivalric novels. [Br. Lit.: Ivanhoe]
References in periodicals archive ?
In Ivanhoe, his most popular novel, Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) utilized the remarkable Jewess, Rebecca, and her father, Isaac of York, to expose the barbarity and the inanity of medieval England's "Age of Chivalry," especially its antisemitism.
The Jew, Isaac of York, who seeks shelter from the stormy night, completes the picture.
Just as Scott inverted the image of the sordid Jew usurer, he also, with Isaac of York, inverted that of the Jew as buffoon.
IS Isaac of York (David Horovitch) meant to be a medieval Motson?
Returning home disguised as a pilgrim, he befriends a Jew, Isaac of York, and his daughter Rebecca on the way to the tournament at Ashby.
Without taking leave of their host the next morning, the disguised pilgrim and Isaac of York left Rotherland and continued on to the nearby town of Ashby de la Zouche.
Isaac of York and his daughter, Rebecca, were sitting nearby, and Rebecca suggested to her father that they nurse Ivanhoe until he was well.
The real heroine is Rebecca the Jewess, daughter of the wealthy Isaac of York, and a person of much more character and charm than the mild Rowena.