Isabella

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Isabella,

1296–1358, queen consort of Edward IIEdward II,
1284–1327, king of England (1307–27), son of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile, called Edward of Carnarvon for his birthplace in Wales. The Influence of Gaveston
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 of England, daughter of Philip IVPhilip IV
(Philip the Fair), 1268–1314, king of France (1285–1314), son and successor of Philip III. The policies of his reign greatly strengthened the French monarchy and increased the royal revenues.
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 of France. She married Edward in 1308. Neglected and mistreated by her husband, Isabella nourished hatred for the royal favorites, the Despensers (see Despenser, Hugh leDespenser, Hugh le
, d. 1265, chief justiciar of England. He joined the barons in their struggle against Henry III and received various offices, becoming chief justiciar in 1260. He lost this office in 1261 but was restored to it in 1263.
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), who were responsible (1324) for the confiscation of her estates. In 1325 she was sent to France to negotiate with her brother Charles IV over Gascony. Once there, she ignored royal orders to return to England with her son, the future Edward IIIEdward III,
1312–77, king of England (1327–77), son of Edward II and Isabella. Early Life

He was made earl of Chester in 1320 and duke of Aquitaine in 1325 and accompanied his mother to France in 1325.
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. Becoming the mistress of Roger de MortimerMortimer, Roger de, 1st earl of March,
1287?–1330, English nobleman. He inherited (c.1304) the vast estates and the title of his father, Edmund, 7th baron of Wigmore.
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, later 1st earl of March, she plotted with him to invade England. Their invasion in 1326 was successful. After Edward II was forced to abdicate and Edward III was enthroned early in 1327, Isabella and Mortimer caused the murder of Edward II and began a corrupt rule of England. Finally rebelling against the couple's flagrant misgovernment, Edward III seized power in 1330, had Mortimer executed, and forced Isabella to retire.

Bibliography

See biography by A. Weir (2005).

Isabella

 

an American variety of grapes, a natural hybrid (Vitis labrusca X V. viniferd). In the USSR, Isabella grapes are found in the humid regions of the Georgian SSR, in the Azerbaijan SSR, in Krasnoiarsk Krai, and in the Crimea, and their use is in prospect in the Moldavian SSR (except for the northern regions). This grape variety is relatively resistant to fungus diseases (mildew and oidium), and also to phylloxera. The grapes are black with a slimy pulp and a distinctive smell; they ripen late and are used fresh as well as in wine-making. Isabella grapes are also used as a decorative climber.

Isabella

frustrates captor while pretending compliance. [Ital. Opera: Rossini, Italian Girl in Algeria, Westerman, 118–119]
See: Cunning

Isabella

original name Elizabeth Farnese. 1692--1766, second wife (1714--46) of Philip V of Spain and mother of Charles III of Spain
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking to the importance of written texts in swaying public opinion, (8) Lehfeldt analyzes the chronicles of four Isabelline historians (Juan de Flores, Alfonso de Palencia, Fernando del Pulgar, and Diego de Valera) to demonstrate that their widely divergent views of her rule--from celebratory to defensive, and on to openly apprehensive--in turn reveal considerable ambivalence toward the monarchs' gendered roles.
Weissberger's analyses extend not only to the Isabelline historians studied in the above two collections (Martin de Cordoba, Alfonso de Palencia, Fernando del Pulgar), and the works of poets and writers Gomez de Manrique, Inigo de Mendoza, Anton de Montoro, Juan de Flores, and Luis de Lucena, but in a surprising twist, to several anonymous pornographic poems.
Although, in the book, as in the essays, one might wish for a more profound analysis of the orphaned girl who, at seventeen, appropriated an alien throne, and of the mature queen who, bereft of her only son, revoked her daughter's right to rule, we are greatly in their debt for bringing us ever closer to the historical realities of Isabelline court life and culture.
Most Italian houses in fact did not profess the Isabelline Rule.
This rule was closely related to the so-called Isabelline Rule, which Bonaventure had helped compose.
The term Isabelline is commonly applied to individual birds that have faded plumage (for example, Everitt and Miskelly 2003; van Grouw 2006); to the best of our knowledge, it is rarely applied to mammals that have diluted pelage, where "partial albino" is often incorrectly used (Jones 1920).
While the Isabelline color variant of Red Squirrels appears to be quite rare, there were 2 Red Squirrels collected together in the late 1980s near Burwash Landing, Yukon (225 km WNW of Whitehorse), that were also of Isabelline coloration (C Buchanan, Caribou Crossing Trading Post, pers.
Luckily, heavy cloud and rain overnight kept the isabelline wheatear in situ and, the next morning, I found myself striding towards Carmel Head to look at the bird.
Mike said twitchers had flocked to see the Isabelline Wheatear and as they clamoured for a glimpse they stumbled across the Tawny Pipit.
Rare visitors such as this great white pelican at Malltraeth (above) and Isabelline wheatear at Cemlyn (right) have brought keen birders flocking to North Wales Pelican picture: MARC HUGHES' Wheatear: STEPHEN MENZIES