Ish-bosheth


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Ish-bosheth

(ĭsh-bō`shĕth, ĭsh-bŏsh`ĕth), in the Bible, son of Saul, and his would-be successor. An alternate form is Esh-baal. For the relation between the names of this man, see BaalBaal
, plural Baalim
[Semitic,=master, lord], name used throughout the Bible for the chief deity or for deities of Canaan. The term was originally an epithet applied to the storm god Hadad.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Soon after Saul and Jonathan died in battle against the Philistines, Abner son of Ner, Saul's army commander, had taken Ish-bosheth son of Saul and brought him across to Mahanaim and made him king over Gilead, the Ashurites, Jezreel, Ephraim, and Benjamin [and] over all Israel (II Sam.
The Bible relates that Ish-bosheth son of Saul was forty years old when he became king of Israel, and he reigned two years.
If, after the death of Saul, Ish-bosheth sat on the throne of Israel and his kingdom lasted for two years, but at the same point in time David had reigned over Judah for seven years and six months, this strongly suggests that David had conquered the southern kingdom of Judah five and a half years before Ishbosheth ascended the throne of Israel, and, most likely, five and a half years before Saul's death.
5) Later, Saul's heir, Ish-bosheth, is killed in his bed by two of his own officers (II Sam.
1020-928 BCE) and the assassination of Ish-Bosheth leads to a total of 15 murdered monarchs out of 44 (34%).
The message is clear, but apparently does not register with the men of Ish-Bosheth, son of King Saul.
David also sent messengers to Ish-bosheth son of Saul, to say, "Give me my wife Michal, for whom I paid the bride-price of one hundred Philistine foreskins" (II Sam.
When addressing Ish-bosheth, David referred to my wife Michal, since he wanted to emphasize his legal marriage to Michal so that Ish-bosheth would be responsive.
The Bible tells of the protracted struggle for the throne that ensues after the death of Saul, between his son Ish-bosheth and David (II Sam.
The major instances of fraternal violence identified here, with presumed primary cause are: (1) the Golden Calf [religious zealousness], (2) Korah [individual rivalry], (3) Peor [religious zealousness], (4) Jephthah [economic inter-tribal rivalry], (5) Gibeah [inter-tribal juridical jurisdiction], (6) David versus Ish-bosheth [individual and tribal rivalry], (7) David versus Absalom [individual rivalry], (8) Abijah versus Jeroboam [inter-kingdom warfare], (9) Baasha versus Asa [inter-kingdom warfare], (10) Jehoash versus Amaziah [inter-kingdom warfare], (11) Pekah versus Ahaz [inter-kingdom warfare/regional power struggle].