Ising model

(redirected from Ising spin model)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Ising model

A model which consists of a lattice of “spin” variables with two characteristic properties: (1) each of the spin variables independently takes on either the value +1 or the value -1; and (2) only pairs of nearest-neighboring spins can interact. The study of this model in two dimensions forms the basis of the modern theory of phase transitions and, more generally, of cooperative phenomena.

A macroscopic piece of material consists of a large number of atoms, the number being of the order of the Avogadro number (approximately 6 × 1023). Thermodynamic phenomena all depend on the participation of such a large number of atoms. Even though the fundamental interaction between atoms is short-ranged, the presence of this large number of atoms can, under suitable conditions, lead to an effective interaction between widely separated atoms. Phenomena due to such effective long-range interactions are referred to as cooperative phenomena. The simplest examples of cooperative phenomena are phase transitions. The most familiar phase transition is either the condensation of steam into water or the freezing of water into ice. Only slightly less familiar is the ferromagnetic phase transition that takes place at the Curie temperature, which, for example, is roughly 1043 K for iron. See Curie temperature, Ferromagnetism, Phase transitions

Ising model

[′ī·ziŋ ‚mäd·əl]
(solid-state physics)
A crude model of a ferromagnetic material or an analogous system, used to study phase transitions, in which atoms in a one-, two-, or three-dimensional lattice interact via Ising coupling between nearest neighbors, and the spin components of the atoms are coupled to a uniform magnetic field.