Avalon

(redirected from Isle of Avalon)
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Avalon

(ăv`əlŏn), in Celtic mythology, the blissful otherworld of the dead. In medieval romance it was the island to which the mortally wounded King Arthur was taken, and from which it was expected he would someday return. Avalon is often identified with GlastonburyGlastonbury
, town (1991 pop. 6,751), Somerset, SW England. It has a leather industry, but Glastonbury is famous for its religious associations and many legends. One legend tells that St. Joseph of Arimathea founded the first Christian church in England there.
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 in Somerset, England.

Avalon

the blissful otherworld of the dead. [Celtic Myth.: NCE, 194]
See: Heaven

Avalon

island where dead King Arthur was carried. [Arth. Legend and Br. Lit.: Le Morte d’Arthur; Idylls of the King; The Once and Future King]
References in periodicals archive ?
GLASTONBURY is thought to be the entrance to the legendary Isle of Avalon.
Behind Glastonbury tourist information office you can view a rotting canoe, a relic from about 50AD when this whole low-lying area surrounding the tor really was the Isle of Avalon, full of misty lake settlements cut off from the rest of the country by shallow waters and marshes.
The mythologyAccording to some folks, in centuries gone by Glastonbury was the fabled Isle of Avalon and the resting place of King Arthur.
At the time of Christ, the mean sea level was 9ft higher than it is today (DT Pugh: Tides, Surges and Mean Sea Level) and the church of the earliest religious community in Britain, in the 2nd century AD, where Glastonbury Abbey is now, stood on an island at high tide, known as the Isle of Avalon.
Just outside Glastonbury - and visible from miles around - is the famous Tor or fabled Isle of Avalon, known in Celtic mythology as the 'Island of the Blessed Souls' and linked with King Arthur.
The earliest Christian monastery in Britain, built of wattles in the second century AD where Glastonbury Abbey now stands on low-lying land at a point in the Bristol Channel where the fortnightly spring tides reach up to 40ft, was built on raised ground in a salt marsh, often referred to as the Isle of Avalon because the spring tides reached beyond it to the foot of Glastonbury tor, and the early religious community there had to take out boats if they wished to leave the monastery at high tide.