Isogloss


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Isogloss

 

in linguistic geography, a line on a map designating the distributional boundaries of a given linguistic phenomenon (phonetic, morphological, syntactic, lexical). For example, an isoglossal line can be drawn showing the distribution of the word gomonit’ (“to din”) in the meaning of govorit’ (“to talk”) in the southwestern regions of the RSFSR, and for the Indo-Iranian languages it is possible, with the aid of an isogloss, to mark the areas that use enclitic pronouns in a subjective, objective, or attributive function. Along with the general term “isogloss” there are also specific terms such as isophone (an isogloss showing the distribution of a sound) and isosyntagm (an isogloss showing the distribution of a syntactic phenomenon).

References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps, then, the attempt to define a broad dialect area is unhelpful, as all dialect features will show different distributional patterns, meaning that an isogloss for a dialect region is dependent on which features are selected for analysis, as stated by Davis (2000: 257): "dialect areas are, in large measure, a function of the items one selects, and that changing those items even slightly can result in very different sets of boundaries".
In the case of isogloss mapping in particular, lines are drawn based on researchers' decisions about the location of observed data points (Kirk, Sanderson, and Widdowson 1985; Ormeling 1992).
It is an ambiguous isogloss as UE2 and CA share 1sg.
97 (2)), Kent is outside the area enclosed by the isogloss which marks this change to i- in the map.
Yet pur alone seems to be sufficient to establish the Northwestern position of Gurgani for this isogloss.
The isogloss for SVO also embraces Cambodian/Khmer (where the morphology is largely moribund) and Indonesian-Malay and some other Austronesian languages of the area.
On isogloss bundles and their frequent correlation with cultural traits, see Chambers and Trudgill 1998: 94-96, 100-102.
If an expression exceptional to the other Finnic dialects occurs in Finnish or North Estonian dialects, its isogloss often approximates the boundary of the language, e.
That isogloss is also the one least constrained by data, except in Berks/Oxon (Kitson 1993: 16).
For years, when linguists compared the verbal isogloss yenager vs.
247): It is not the superlative suffix *-mmo- but the conglomerate superlative suffix *-is-mmo- that is a distinctive Italo-Celtic isogloss.
That is, beyond this one important isogloss, there is nothing uniquely "North African" about Upper Egyptian Arabic.