Albright, Ivan Le Lorraine

(redirected from Ivan Albright)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Albright, Ivan Le Lorraine

(ôl`brīt), 1897–1983, American painter, b. North Harvey, Ill. Allied with the Magic Realist group, Albright developed a style combining American scene painting with surrealist influences. He sought to portray the decadence of mankind and the horror of America during the depression. His compositions, such as Poor Room (1942; artist's coll.), contain much realistic detail organized into a fantastic conglomeration. The surfaces of his works are uniform in texture, predominantly gray in tone, and sordid in effect.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
She was especially close to her "superpal" Ivan Albright, perhaps the most talented of the three, whose portraits and still lifes were so intricately crafted that they often took years to complete, sometimes using a single hair as a brush.
He doesn't discuss, for example, the significant horror imagery that bridges high and popular culture by people like William Blake, Francisco Goya, and Ivan Albright (the artist who created the corrupted painting for the film version of The Picture of Dorian Gray [1945]).
Anatomy/Academy includes works by William Rush, Thomas Eakins, Christian Schussele, Thomas Anshutz, Alice Barber Stephens, Edweard Muybridge, Charles Grafly, Marcel Duchamp, Robert Henri, Ivan Albright, John Sloan, and Arthur B.
Is Lutes heir to the roughneck figural surrealism dating back to Chicago artists such as Ivan Albright, Seymour Rosofsky, and Ed Paschke?
We look at the textures used by Albrecht Durer, Ivan Albright, and the woodcarvings of the Oaxacan Indians.
Ivan Albright, however, chose to paint a portrait of a middle-aged woman who truly had good reason for sadness because she has forever lost the good looks of her youth.
Ivan Albright and his twin brother, Malvin, were the sons of a succesful Chicago-area artist, Adam Emory Albright.
The son of an artist and the twin of another, Ivan Albright was one of Chicago's greatest and most original painters.
Because Ivan Albright was greatly attracted by the great painters of Northern Europe, he tried to emulate their working habits in every way possible.
Chicago collectors of Picasso and Ivan Albright took to Dubuffet like one of their own, just as their forebears had embraced French Impressionism, to which Dubuffet's work provided many not-so-subtle links.
For anyone meditating on family values, Greenwold's new painting, The Risk of Existence (for Anya), 1997-98, all of 14 inches square, is bound to inspire a chill of recognition and horror: Ivan Albright meets Charles Addams.
Freud lets us know in no uncertain terms what he thinks of women who are no longer "girls" an have the temerity to take their clothes off in front of him: neither Titian nor Velasquez comes to mind, but Ivan Albright at his scariest.