Ivo of Chartres, Saint

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Ivo of Chartres, Saint

(ī`vō, shär`trə), c.1040–c.1116, French churchman, bishop of Chartres (after 1090). He was fearlessly outspoken and was briefly imprisoned for opposing the irregular second marriage of King Philip IPhilip I,
1052–1108, king of France (1060–1108), son and successor of Henry I. He enlarged, by arms and by diplomacy, his small royal domain. In order to prevent the union of England and Normandy under a single ruler, he consistently supported Robert II of Normandy
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 of France. He worked to obtain a compromise in the struggle over investitures. His principal fame was for his knowledge of canon lawcanon law,
in the Roman Catholic Church, the body of law based on the legislation of the councils (both ecumenical and local) and the popes, as well as the bishops (for diocesan matters).
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. His Decretum and Panormia, collections of canons, were perhaps the most extensive until supplanted by the work of GratianGratian,
fl. 1140, Italian legal scholar, founder of the science of canon law. Almost nothing is known of his life beyond the fact that he was a monk, almost certainly Camaldolite, and that he taught at the convent of saints Felix and Nabor (San Felice) in Bologna.
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. In the prologue to these collections Ivo attempted to establish a hierarchy for the reconciliation of discordant laws, a system with methodological import for the rise of scholasticismscholasticism
, philosophy and theology of Western Christendom in the Middle Ages. Virtually all medieval philosophers of any significance were theologians, and their philosophy is generally embodied in their theological writings.
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. Feast: May 24.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) In September 1092, Bertrada and Philip were married, provoking outrage from Ivo of Chartres, who refused to recognise the legitimacy of their union and deplored the behaviour of those senior bishops loyal to the crown.
14) To the frustration of both Ivo of Chartres and Pope Urban II, the archbishops of Reims, Tours, and Sens all recognised the marriage.
While Abelard makes no explicit mention of Bertrada in the Historia caIamitatum, his opposition to William of Champeaux, closely associated with Bertrada's leading critic, Ivo of Chartres, implies that he was naturally sympathetic to the Queen.
After the death of William de Montfort in the Holy Land in 1102, there was no bishop in Paris until Ivo of Chartres supported the election of Fulco, canon of Senlis, a choice resisted by the archdeacons, Stephen de Garlande and Vulgrin.
Christof ROLKER, Canon Law and the Letters of Ivo of Chartres (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge-New York 2010, XIII + 386 pp.
The <<corpus>> of the letters of Ivo of Chartres
The considerable significance of the letters of Ivo of Chartres is indubitable (28), especially because this rich material is inserted at the end of his canonical collection in a high number of textual witnesses (29).
Therefore, according to our settled opinion, we can reconstruct only the supposed original intention and the particular segment of clerics whom Ivo of Chartres was addressing when he compiled a canonical reading-book.
This kind of treatment is missed for thinkers like Anselm, any of the thinkers and poets associated with Chartrian thinking, Abelard, Peter Lombard, or the canon lawyers Ivo of Chartres or Huguccio.
137), that were added to manuscripts containing the works attributed to Ivo of Chartres.
Robert Somerville also uses an addition, specifically a group of anonymous decrees inserted into a twelfth-century manuscript containing the Panormia attributed to Ivo of Chartres.
In general, however, and in particular with the most influential collections of Burchard of Worms and Ivo of Chartres, the content rather than the derivation of a particular text, whether of conciliar origin or not, came to matter once it had been absorbed by a systematic collection" ("Conciliar Canons," 367).