Jabneh

Jabneh

(jăb`nē), variant of JamniaJamnia
, biblical Jabneel and Jabneh [Heb.,=God causes to build], ancient city, central Israel. Its modern name is Yavne. A central city of Philistia, the Bible refers to its walls being destroyed by Uzziah. It was pillaged by Judas Maccabaeus and later rebuilt.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Things changed when the eminent Gamliel of Jabneh adapted a simple burial style for the relatives of the deceased and, "Then all the people followed his example" and remembered him with affection.
The library of the Brooklyn Jewish Center will be another Academy of Jabneh offering unceasing defiance to Nazi brutishness and witnessing the indestructible life of the human spirit.
Another Academy of Jabneh," Brooklyn Jewish Center Review, 6 (January 1935).
Thus, it is reasonable to assume that our texts give us a reasonable indication as to the content of the eighteen benedictions instituted at Jabneh, even if our texts are centuries later.
He considers the movement of Pharisaic Judaism toward closing the canon even before Jabneh, toward fixing the biblical text, and as well the corresponding Christian acceptance of the LXX and much of Jewish apocrypha which rabbinic Judaism rejected, and in what seems to me an accountable fashion he traces this dissonance and its dialectical history through to Enlightenment Protestantism.
Things changed when the eminent Gamliel of Jabneh adopted a simple burial style for the relatives of the deceased and, "Then all the people followed his example" and remembered him with affection (Ketubot, 8B).
The later Jewish tradition inspired by Johanan and the Jabneh school disowned Josephus for his honesty, and this explains why neither Josephus nor Johanan mentioned each other.
The Pharisee and Tanna Yohannan Ben Zakkai sought a favor from Emperor Vespasian, who condescendingly let him establish his little school at Jabneh, and there he assembled fellow rabbanim and students into what became the spiritual center of Judaism and its sustaining pillar after both Temple and state were shattered.
AD 200, it preserves the old traditions which had survived after AD 70 in the rabbinical centres at Jabneh and later in Galilee.
Tarfon (first/second century CE) was a Tannai, an outstanding scholar and a teacher at the academy of Jabneh.