jaçana

(redirected from Jacanas)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Jacanas: Jacanidae

jaçana

(jəkăn`ə, jəkän`ə), common name for members of the Jacanidae, a family of tropical and subtropical wading birds. Jaçanas, also called lily-trotters and lotus-birds, have long toes and toenails that enable them to walk delicately on floating vegetation as they search for insects and mollusks. Like certain of the related plovers, jaçanas have defensive spurs on the angles of their wings. The American jaçana (10 in./25 cm long), Jacana spinosa, is cinnamon red with striking yellow-green wing patches. The female jaçana is slightly larger than the male, but has similar coloration. It lays about 4 eggs per clutch, which is incubated by the male for three to four weeks. Jaçanas are excellent swimmers and divers and build their nests to float on water. They are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
..... Click the link for more information.
, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Charadriiformes, family Jacanidae.
References in periodicals archive ?
New elevated walkways bring you eye-to-eye with African jacanas and the rare waldrapp ibis from Morocco.
She laments that previous work on female ornamentation has mostly occurred in sex-role-reversed birds like jacanas, where a big bold female defends a territory and monopolizes the males within it (SN: 3/6/99, p.
The reverse situation appears among 14 species, including two pipefish and such birds as phalaropes and jacanas.
These 20 or so species are mostly shorebirds, such as the painted snipe, plus 7 of the 8 tropical wetland species known as jacanas.
Bronze-winged jacanas live role reversal to the max, Butchart and his colleagues report in the March ANIMAL BEHAVOUR.
Among wattled jacanas in Panama, he and colleague Stephen Emlen heard similar yelling when males noticed a scary predator.
Male wattled jacanas can easily collect such evidence.
When it comes to the standard male jockeying to assure paternity, the bronze-winged jacana doesn't have a lot of options, Butchart notes.
Fossils with modern counterparts include those of jacanas, shoebilled storks, herons, cranes, cormorants, ospreys, eagles and other birds that rely on areas of open water.