Jacob Roggeveen


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Roggeveen, Jacob

 

Born January 1659, in Middelburg; died there February 1729. Dutch navigator.

In 1721, Roggeveen was sent by the Dutch West India Company to search for the great land thought to be west of Chile, and in 1722 he discovered Easter Island, several large atolls in the Tuamotu Archipelago, and the Manu’a Islands, Tutuila, and Upolu in the Samoan group.

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The Kon-Tiki experiment now has additional support from a genetic study in Easter Island that suggests that the Rapanui people who lived on the islands had contact with Native Americans hundreds of years before Dutch commander Jacob Roggeveen arrived at the islands.
Roelof van Gelder, Naar het aards paradijs: Het rusteloze leven van Jacob Roggeveen, ontdekker van Paaseiland, 1659-1729.
By the time Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen landed on the island on Easter Day in 1722, he found a desolate landscape void of trees or bushes over ten feet high with no birds, bats, or lizards.
One of the world's most isolated inhabited places, Easter Island was formed by three extinct volcanoes and named by Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen, who became the first recorded European to set foot on the island on Easter Sunday, 1722.
ONE of the world's most isolated, inhabited places Easter Island was formed by three extinct volcanoes and named by Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen who visited the island on Easter Sunday, 1722.
In fact, the first European to arrive at the island, Dutch Admiral Jacob Roggeveen, noted, "The stone heads surprised us.
Desde el 5 de abril de 1722, dia de Pascua de Resurreccion, cuando et holandes Jacob Roggeveen llego, la isla fue visitada por aventureros y balleneros europeos, quienes supusieron que si la isla carecia de dueno, sus habitantes podian ser esclavizados.
Otro misterioso ejemplo de escritura indescifrable es el descubierto en 1722 por el holandes Jacob Roggeveen, quien encontro varios centenares de figuras de piedra de gran tamano, en la isla de Pascua, en Polinesia.
The island received its name because it was discovered on Easter Sunday 1722 by its first recorded European visitor, the Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen, who was searching for Davis Island.
By the time Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen came upon the island in 1722, nearly all these figures were toppled, and many broken.
In 1722, Jacob Roggeveen discovered an island "of a singular poverty and barrenness" (Sharp 1970: 93) covered with dry grass.
In 1722 the Dutch navigator Jacob Roggeveen (1659-1729) came across a small island, 45 square miles in area, that was one of the most isolated bits of land in the world.