Jacobean architecture


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Related to Jacobean architecture: Jacobean Style

Jacobean architecture

Jacobean architecture a manor house
An imprecise term, applied to an English architectural style of the early 17th century that adapted the Elizabethan style to continental Renaissance influences; applied to buildings erected during the reign of James I (1603–1625) and thereafter. Large houses were usually two to three stories high and might have elaborate multicurved Flemish gables, Tudor arches, and decorative chimneys, and casement windows (separated by stone or cement mullions) that had small, diamond-shaped panes of glass held in place by grooved strips of lead.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hailed as one of the country's finest surviving examples of Jacobean architecture, the Grade One-listed building has been closed to the public for almost three years while skilled craftsmen painstakingly restored its unique features, many of which date back to the time of the Civil War and the reign of Charles I.
In this wonderfully illustrated book, Nicholas Cooper takes us on a journey through some of the finest examples of Jacobean architecture around today.
Two 16th and 17th century merchants' houses lurk there, one of them a rare example of Jacobean architecture.
outstanding example of Jacobean architecture and one of the most important historic buildings of its type in the Midlands.
A pounds 10 million restoration project for Aston Hall and its park, the county's finest example of Jacobean architecture, is also being finalised.
The Feathers Hotel is internationally recognised for its beautiful Jacobean architecture and medieval heritage.