Jacobite

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Jacobite

1. Brit History an adherent of James II (1633--1701, king of England, Ireland, and, as James VII, of Scotland, 1685--88) after his overthrow in 1688, or of his descendants in their attempts to regain the throne
2. a member of the Monophysite Church of Syria, which became a schismatic church in 451 ad
References in periodicals archive ?
During the nineteenth century, mainstream scholars--embedded in the teleological, progressivist mores of their time--had little but contempt for Jacobitism (including its Irish nationalist dimensions), a movement so obviously at variance with the seemingly inexorable destiny of the British state: continuous progress, imperial hegemony, constitutional governance, and Anglican orthodoxy.
The reality of the 1790s--and, for that matter, of 1816-teaches precisely the opposite: Wardour's misguided and stubborn aloofness from the "paltry concern of pounds, shillings, and pence," combined with his misguided investments in golden schemes, emerges as a much more serious offense than his family's dated Jacobitism and is explicitly described by the novel as rebellion and treason.
The "rhetorics of viewing" chosen for its various depictions and descriptions between 1768 and 1820 can be understood, he argues, in relation to the threat of Jacobitism.
Here, we might wish that McNeil had included Scott's "The Surgeon's Daughter," with its less positive view of the British in India--founded on a vexed notion of Jacobitism, money, and professionalism related to but vastly different from that in Rob Roy.
He also shows that Jacobitism was not just a 'romantic' loyalty to the Stuarts held by conservative Highlanders, but was a coherent view of life, history and government shared by many different groups in various classes in both England and Scotland.
Anne Murray was a daughter of the 4th Baron Elibank -- but barons are quite low down in the Scots nobility, and her family was tainted with Jacobitism.
Their anger at the way they were treated by the new British Government helped to once again fan the flames of Jacobitism and led to a remarkable attempt to snatch the British throne which could very easily have succeeded.
97) The reference to the Jacobite lord executed two years earlier was less likely intended as a declaration of political allegiance (except insofar as Jacobitism served as a generalized plebeian "idiom of defiance"), than to underscore Neale's determination to die, as Balmerino famously had done, "with uncommon firmness and intrepidity.
The novel's plot--which revolves around some stolen bills whose disappearance threatens to bankrupt the Highlands--is a case in point: Jacobitism is represented, not as the expression of archaic clan loyalties, but as a local articulation of modern, imperially determined fluctuations of credit.
While south Munster bishops are said to have engaged at most in a discreet and passive Jacobitism, they were, with their clergy, part "of a remarkable cultural phenomenon: the quite exceptional level of vernacular literary production that occurred in the region in the course of the eighteenth century" (260).
Not so warmly in Warwickshire, where Jacobitism proved strongly entrenched, but with some relief in the diocese of Winchester, where leaders were energetic against "popery.
That a stolidly Low Church magnate of Hanoverian Britain, who was punctilious in his duty, as the King's first minister, to thwart Jacobitism and the Papacy that supported it, should buy Renis and Murillos was not surprising.