Lefèvre d'Étaples, Jacques

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Lefèvre d'Étaples, Jacques

(zhäk ləfăv`rə dātäp`lə), c.1450–1536, French theologian and humanist. A priest, he studied in Italy, where he was influenced by Neoplatonism. In 1507, he was made librarian at the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. He became famous for his commentary on the epistles of St. Paul (1512) and his edition of the works of the mystic, Nicholas of Cusa (1514). Caught up in the spirit of criticism of the abuses of the Roman Catholic Church, he became a leading figure of Christian humanism. Although advocating some of the ideas later integral to the Reformation, he believed, like Erasmus, in reform from within and refused to break with the church. Nevertheless, he was subjected to suspicion and persecution. In 1521, the Sorbonne condemned as heretical his book on the three Marys, but Francis I and his sister Margaret of Navarre prevented further action against him. Forced to seek refuge in Strasbourg in 1525, he returned the following year as tutor to the royal children and librarian in the château at Blois. His last years were spent at Nérac, under the protection of Margaret of Navarre. The Protestant reformer Guillaume FarelFarel, Guillaume
, 1489–1565, French religious reformer, associate of John Calvin. In 1520, Farel joined Jacques Lefèvre d'Étaples at Meaux to aid in church reform and to establish an evangelical school for students and preachers.
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 was one of his pupils. Lefèvre d'Étaples translated the Bible into French (1523–30). He was also known as Jacobus Faber Stapulensis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Before Martin Luther beat his 95 Theses into the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg--an act that is usually credited with starting the Protestant Reformation--a priest named Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples was already convinced the church needed reforming.
The remaining chapters examine the concept in a systematic analysis of Calvin's work, then turn to the impact of Calvin on Renaissance humanism, with discussion of the work of Erasmus, Pico della Mirandola, and Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples.
Charles Nauert has judicious comments on Celtis, Agricola, Reuchlin, Fichet, Gaguin, Linacre, and others, but keys his essay to the "true inventors" of a "fully developed" Christian humanism (172), Jacques Lefevre D'Etaples and Erasmus, emphasizing the paradigmatic force of the union between Erasmus's notion of "the philosophy of Christ" and his accomplishments as a philologist (179).
Bedouelle, of the University of Fribourg, is concerned almost entirely with Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples (Jacobus Faber), and Erasmus is relegated to a brief paragraph.
Important figures such as the humanist Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples appear, as do Erasmus's critics, Noel Beda and Pierre Cousturier (Sutor).
However, this does not mean that the intellect can know the mind of God, or that Peletier is interested in the theologia mathematica that previously preoccupied the circle of Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples.
Nicholas Hospital at Kues as a Spiritual Legacy of Nicholas o f Cusa"; and Yelena Matusevich, "Jean Gerson (1363-1429), Nicholas of Cusa (1401-64), Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples (1450-1537): The Continuity of Ideas.
Some leading French humanists, such as Guillaume Bude and Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples, are rarely or never mentioned.
The scholarly tenets formulated by Barbaro and his circle impacted the scholarship of all of Italy and Europe, including the writings of Erasmus and Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples who found in Barbaro's reconciliation of the classical with the evangelical the solution for their own scholarly dilemmas and those of Galileo, who found in the naturalistic orientation and exact philology of Barbaro the source and inspiration for his own scholarly and scientific activities.
The only person to publish apocryphal writings within a New Testament and to pose the question of their relationship to the canon was the French humanist Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples, especially in his Latin edition of Saint Paul's Epistles of 1512 and in his edition of Hermas's Sheperd of 1513, along with his earlier, brief mentioning of the problem in his edition of the [Pseudo-]Clementine Recognitiones of 1504.
Here D'Amico provides an effective overview of the humanists' treatment of theology from Petrarch to Gianfrancesco Pico della Mirandola, and to the northern humanists Erasmus and Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples.
I have excluded self-described humanists such as Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples and Josse Clichtove.