Jamaicans


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Jamaicans

 

a nation (natsiia, nation in the historical sense) and the indigenous population of Jamaica. According to a 1977 estimate, there are 2 million Jamaicans. The overwhelming majority are Negroes and mulattoes; the former are descended from the Africans brought to the island as slaves, primarily between the 16th and early 19th centuries. After the mid-19th century, workers were brought from India and China to labor on the plantations; their descendants have for the most part intermingled with the Negro population. The majority of Jamaicans speak a creolized form of English. Most religious believers are Protestants, chiefly Anglicans or Baptists; many elements of African religions have been preserved.

References in periodicals archive ?
The event celebrates Jamaican Independent Day on Sunday, marking 55 years since the island broke away from British rule.
Initially as Velma Newton points out in The Silver Men, California was the destination of many dispossessed Jamaicans.
The Town Hall raised the Jamaican flag at the request of the Jamaican Embassy in London in honour of the "auspicious occasion".
And the organisers hope to cap the weekend celebrations late on Sunday evening by screening a Jamaican victory for Usain Bolt in the Olympics 100m final.
Some of the world's top sports stars have been travelling in style after MG supplied a fleet of vehicles to the Jamaican and USA Track and Field training camps.
Trinidadians, on the other hand, see Jamaicans as being much too serious.
In an attempt to better unpack the complex transnational Jamaican family, Elaine Bauer and Paul Thompson have collected life history interviews from people of Jamaican origin living in Britain, the United States, Canada, and Jamaica.
The purpose was to provide Civil Society training to Jamaican organizations involved in numerous causes, including AIDS education, constitutional reform, and preventing violence against women.
William Brown and Lee Cronk of Rutgers and their colleagues used cameras to track laser reflectors fastened on people and then made 40 animations of young Jamaicans dancing to the same pop song (see video at http:// grail.
This show has a strong conceptual component," theorizing about "the proximity that Jamaicans live and work to the earth and how this comes across in the artwork.
That Hebrew Psalms have found a permanent home in the musical rhythms of Rastafari (the movement) is a tribute to the powerful reggae cultural revolution of the last decades, but it also shows how profoundly the Bible resonates with the political ideology of the Jamaican Rastafari.