Jamaicans


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Jamaicans

 

a nation (natsiia, nation in the historical sense) and the indigenous population of Jamaica. According to a 1977 estimate, there are 2 million Jamaicans. The overwhelming majority are Negroes and mulattoes; the former are descended from the Africans brought to the island as slaves, primarily between the 16th and early 19th centuries. After the mid-19th century, workers were brought from India and China to labor on the plantations; their descendants have for the most part intermingled with the Negro population. The majority of Jamaicans speak a creolized form of English. Most religious believers are Protestants, chiefly Anglicans or Baptists; many elements of African religions have been preserved.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Town Hall raised the Jamaican flag at the request of the Jamaican Embassy in London in honour of the "auspicious occasion".
As providers of cars to the Jamaican Track and Field team during their stay near their training camp in Birmingham, MG Motors will be present at this event entitled Jamaica In The Square which will celebrate everything about Jamaica, its culture, music, dancing, cuisine and fashion.
And the organisers hope to cap the weekend celebrations late on Sunday evening by screening a Jamaican victory for Usain Bolt in the Olympics 100m final.
Some of the world's top sports stars have been travelling in style after MG supplied a fleet of vehicles to the Jamaican and USA Track and Field training camps.
It seems to me that we Jamaicans know how to enjoy life by doing interesting things and going to interesting places, but that Trinis know how to enjoy each other, that is to "lime.
Q: The Jamaican record business wasn't terribly sophisticated then.
The purpose was to provide Civil Society training to Jamaican organizations involved in numerous causes, including AIDS education, constitutional reform, and preventing violence against women.
To Leonard Howell, one of the Jamaican pioneers of Rastafari, the prophetic declaration in Psalm 68:31--"Princes shall come out of Egypt; Ethiopia shall soon stretch out her hands unto God"--was an indispensable paradigm for positing the messianic fulfillment of the Bible in the person of Haile Selassie I.
Gordon states her chief themes explicitly: "first, that the Christianization of approximately half the population by the end of slavery was overwhelmingly the achievement of black and colored teachers, both independent preachers and the leadership of the dissenting chapels; second, that the conversion was progressively associated with the growing aspirations, both for freedom and sociopolitical recognition, of slaves and free coloreds and blacks of many generations; third, that by 1838 there was a dawning awareness of a Jamaican identity among the colored population, if only because they had nowhere else to go.
It's an American fallacy that Jamaicans are not serious about conducting business -- having a come tomorrow attitude.
This portrayal, I believe, undermines Powell's exploration of homosexuality in Jamaica because it gives homophobic Jamaicans the opportunity to dismiss Dale as a confused, economically deprived woman in a man's body.
We are very excited to be able to offer this service to Jamaican expatriates," said Kevin Hartz, co-founder and CEO of Xoom.