James Clerk Maxwell Telescope


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James Clerk Maxwell Telescope

(jaymz klark maks -wĕl) (JCMT) A 15-meter diameter radio telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, at an altitude of 4100 meters. It operates in the millimeter and submillimeter wavebands, between 2 mm and 350 μm. The primary reflector consists of 276 adjustable panels, which give a surface accuracy of better than 30 μm. It is equipped with line receivers and continuum receivers at the Cassegrain and two Nasmyth foci; for maximum sensitivity the receivers are cryogenically cooled to 4 K (line) and as low as 0.1 K (continuum). The telescope has an altazimuth mounting and is housed in a carousel that rotates with the antenna. The JCMT became operational in Dec. 1986. It is operated by the Joint Astronomy Center in Hilo, Hawaii on behalf of its parent research councils in the United Kingdom, Canada, and the Netherlands.
References in periodicals archive ?
The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope has a primary mirror 49 feet (15 meters) across, making it the largest telescope optimized for observing at submillimeter wavelengths.
That's because I was the first astronomer to observe with the world's first submillimeter telescope, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), which opened for business in 1987.
Greaves and her colleagues observed the star with a high-resolution camera attached to the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii.
0 m Caltech Submillimeter Observatory 10 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope 15 m (Submillimeter) Very Large Baseline Array (Radio) 25 m W.
The two teams used a new high-resolution camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope atop Hawaii's Mauna Kea.
Jewitt and Herve Aussel (University of Hawaii) used the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to measure its brightness at a wavelength of 350 microns.
The observations, taken with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope near the summit of Kea, reveal the relative proportion of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur isotopes in material ejected by the comet.
Greaves (Joint Astronomy Centre, Hawaii) and 10 colleagues discovered the star's dust ring in images they took at a very far infrared wavelength (850 microns) with the 25-meter James Clerk Maxwell telescope atop Mauna Kea.
But observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope atop Hawaii's Mauna Kea reveal that the comet spews a startling amount of carbon monoxide, a molecule that sublimes at a chilly 25 kelvins.
Jewitt (University of Hawaii), who has been observing the comet with the 15-meter James Clerk Maxwell Telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii, agrees.