James VII


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James VII

title as king of Scotland of James II of England and Ireland
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On display here are medals of James VII and II and his descendants, which proclaim them sovereigns of the British Isles 'by the grace of God'.
In a cogently-argued introduction, the editors advance a convincing case for developing the Stevenson thesis further and argue that Scotland saw two revolutions in the century, the covenanting revolution in 1638 and the revolution replacing James VII and II in 1689.
One of the least studied, and primarily from an English perspective, Mann's revaluation of James VII and II provides the most detailed history of the Scottish monarch and challenges presumptions regarding his extreme catholic views and incompetence.
One might quibble with Barbour's use of "interregnum" to describe the period 1649-60 on the grounds that, (a) though commonly to be found, it presupposes an uncompromisingly Royalist standpoint, and (b) strictly speaking, the only true seventeenth-century "interregnum" in the sense of a formal "power vacuum" occurred during the confusingly anarchic few weeks between 23 December 1688, with the deposition and flight to France of James VII & II Stuart and the installation of William of Orange and James's daughter Mary Stuart as joint sovereigns (William I of Scotland and III of England and Mary II), and 13 February 1689 (both dates O.
There was also the issue that James II was also James VII of Scotland.
Claverhouse was killed by an enemy bullet in his hour of victory while fighting for the exiled Stuart King James VII and II against the armies of King William III, at the Battle of Killiecrankie, in 1689.