Jamestown


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Related to Jamestown: John Smith, Historic Jamestowne

Jamestown,

town, port, and capital (1998 pop. 864) of Saint Helena, in the S Atlantic. Once a busy coaling station on the East India route, it lost its importance after the opening of the Suez Canal, although it still supplies water to passing vessels.

See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.

Jamestown.

1 City (1990 pop. 34,681), Chautauqua co., W N.Y., on Chautauqua Lake; founded c.1806, inc. as a city 1886. It is the business and financial center of a dairy, livestock, and vineyard area. The chief industries are food processing and furniture and machine manufacture. Nearby are Allegany State Park and the Chautauqua Institution, a cultural and recreational center on the lake. Lucille BallBall, Lucille,
1911–89, American actress and producer, b. Celoron, N.Y. At first promoted by Hollywood as another glamorous movie star, Ball was often cast as a spunky sidekick in second features.
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 was born in the city.

2 City (1990 pop. 15,571), seat of Stutsman co., SE N.Dak., on the James River, in a farm area; founded 1871 when Fort Seward was established to protect railroad workers, inc. 1896. It is the trade and processing center for an agricultural area where grain and flour are produced and sunflowers and livestock are raised. Processed food, ordnance, and construction materials are manufactured. Jamestown College is in the city. Fort Seward Historic Site and a restored frontier village lie on the outskirts.

3 Former village, SE Va., first permanent English settlement in America; est. May 14, 1607, by the London CompanyLondon Company,
corporation composed of stockholders residing in and about London, which, together with the Plymouth Company (see Virginia Company), was granted (1606) a charter by King James I to found colonies in America.
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 on a marshy peninsula (now an island) in the James River and named for the reigning English monarch, James I. Disease, starvation, and Native American attacks wiped out most of the colony, but the London Company continually sent more men and supplies, and John SmithSmith, John,
c.1580–1631, English colonist in America, b. Willoughby, Lincolnshire, England. A merchant's apprentice until his father's death in 1596, he thereafter lived an adventurous life, traveling, fighting in wars against the Turks in Transylvania and Hungary, and
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 briefly provided efficient leadership (he returned to England in 1609 for treatment of an injury). After the severe winter of 1609–10 (the "starving time"), the survivors prepared to return to England but were stopped by the timely arrival of Lord De la Warr with supplies. John RolfeRolfe, John
, 1585–1622, English colonist in Virginia. He reached the colony in May, 1610, and introduced (1612) the regular cultivation of tobacco, which became Virginia's staple.
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 cultivated the first tobacco there in 1612, introducing a successful source of livelihood; in 1614 he assured peace with the local Native Americans by marrying PocahontasPocahontas
, c.1595–1617, Native North American woman, daughter of Chief Powhatan. Pocahontas, meaning "playful one" (her real name was said to be Matoaka), used to visit the English in Virginia at Jamestown.
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, daughter of chief Powhatan. In 1619 the first representative government in the New World met at Jamestown, which remained the capital of Virginia throughout the 17th cent. The village was almost entirely destroyed during Bacon's RebellionBacon's Rebellion,
popular revolt in colonial Virginia in 1676, led by Nathaniel Bacon. High taxes, low prices for tobacco, and resentment against special privileges given those close to the governor, Sir William Berkeley, provided the background for the uprising, which was
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; it was partially rebuilt but fell into decay with the removal of the capital to Williamsburg (1698–1700).

Of the 17th-century settlement, only the old church tower (built c.1639) and a few gravestones were visible when National Park Service excavations began in 1934. Today, most of Jamestown Island is owned by the U.S. government and is included in Colonial National Historical Park (see National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
, table); a small portion comprises the Jamestown National Historic Site, which is owned by the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities. A tercentenary celebration was held in 1907, and in 1957 the Jamestown Festival Park was built to commemorate the 350th anniversary. The park, which was renamed Jamestown Settlement in 1990, contains exhibit pavilions and replicas of the first fort, the three ships that brought the first settlers, and a Native American village. Excavations that began in 1994 finally uncovered the original fort at Jamestown, which had long been believed to have been eroded away by the river.

Bibliography

See report by the Celebration Commission, The 350th Anniversary of Jamestown, 1607–1957 (1958); C. Bridenbaugh, Jamestown, 1544–1699 (1980); D. A. Price, Love and Hate in Jamestown (2003).

Jamestown

 

a city and administrative center of the island of St. Helena, a possession of Great Britain. Population, 1,500 (1966). It is a port on James Bay, exporting hemp and rope. It supplies fresh water to passing ships.

Jamestown

a ruined village in E Virginia, on Jamestown Island (a peninsula in the James River): the first permanent settlement by the English in America (1607); capital of Virginia (1607--98); abandoned in 1699
References in periodicals archive ?
In Frank Turner Hollon's Jamestown, Alaska, a novelist receives a cryptic invitation to become the official historian of a new civilization set up in the northernmost state.
Jamestown provided over $1 million for renovation of the new facility and operational costs for the first few years of programming.
Over the last 32 years, Jamestown has expanded into a national, vertically integrated real estate operator with approximately USD 9.
The Jamestown Arts Center is a multi-disciplinary visual and performing arts space that hosts art exhibits, theatre and dance performances, film nights, OutLoud events and concerts, and provides art and design educational programs for people of all ages.
We at Nash Finch and Hugo's are so proud to be able to support the already tremendous fundraising efforts Jamestown has initiated to support the Imagination Library," says Alec Covington, CEO of Edina, Minn.
Jane's partial skull and right shin bone were excavated in a structure's cellar by a team led by William Kelso, chief archaeologist of the Jamestown Rediscovery Archaeological Project.
After her death, in a year when many Jamestown colonists starved, Jane's body was hacked apart by a butcher or butchers who barely knew what they were doing.
Jamestown bought out its partners, Angelo, Gordon & Co.
Author, educator, and lecturer Williams writes that while the first permanent English colony at Jamestown seemed doomed to fail for a variety of well-known reasons, the colonists finally found the solutions to put the colony on track for success.
With skillful and well-written reexamination of the records of the first two decades of the Jamestown experience, she reveals how and why the colony ultimately succeeded and argues that what happened at Jamestown created the formula for English colonization to follow.
Kupperman's focus on situating Jamestown within a broader context than would historians of a previous generation produces one of the oddities of the book: she doesn't actually get to the details of Jamestown's founding until the seventh chapter, or two-thirds of the way through her discussion.
Karen Ordahl Kupperman does not celebrate Jamestown in quite the same adulatory way that politicians and patriots will on its four-hundredth birthday, but she does believe that Jamestown is more important than many professional historians seem willing to concede.