January thaw

January thaw

[′jan·yə‚wer·ē ′thȯ]
(climatology)
A period of mild weather popularly supposed to recur each year in late January in New England and other parts of the northeastern United States.
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I am no more lonely than the Mill Brook, or a weathercock, or the north star, or the south wind, or an April shower, or a January thaw, or the first spider in a new house.
The January thaw period begins around now, and often lasts through Jan.
The January Thaw period begins around this date and often lasts through the 25th.
The frigid air and "polar vortex" that affected about 240 million people in the United States and southern Canada will depart during the second half of this week, and a far-reaching January thaw will begin, according to AccuWeather.
While it may not be enough for a January thaw, it should be enough to foster the growth of fundamental change inside the warehouse and DC operations of many of today's supply chain visionaries.
Last winter, a January thaw melted the snow cover on a nearby park pond and revealed dozens of ice stars of various sizes.
The January Thaw in Southern Michigan and Wisconsin, 1950-1999.
7 Possible smaller January Thaw sometime between now and January 10.
January Thaw (1945), which told the adventures of a city couple determined to renovate a Connecticut farmhouse, became a Broadway play.
27: Young animals birthed by the full moon and the January Thaw will run a higher-than-average risk of being chilled by the last cold front of the month.
But snow and especially colder temperatures after a long January thaw have alleviated worries there and in areas such as the Yentna River.
7 Possible smaller January thaw (see January 20 below) sometime between now and January 10.