Jayavarman Vii


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Jayavarman Vii

 

king of Khmer (known in historical literature as Angkor Cambodia). During his reign (1181-1219), the country reached the height of its power. The Angkor monarchy spread its influence north to Vientiane and, after the capture of Champa, east to the East China Sea. The Kingdom reached as far south as the central part of the Malay Peninsula and as far west as Burma. Jayavarman VII initiated the large-scale construction of temples in Southeast Asia.

References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Cambodia Daily, it dated back to the reign of Jayavarman VII, the founder of the Khmer Empire.
Some rulers were aligned with Visnu, while Jayavarman VII portrayed himself as a bodhisattva.
Now nestled in the consuming jungle, the structure was built by Jayavarman VII, the king of the Khmer Empire, at the end of the 12th century as a dedication to Buddhism.
Angkor Thom alone is spread over 10 square miles and was built by Jayavarman VII, the greatest Khmer king in the 13 th century who converted from Hinduism to Buddhism, a faith followed today by 90% of the people.
From the encephalitis study, conducted July 2010 through July 2011, samples from 196 patients were collected as part of a surveillance study of central nervous system infections in Jayavarman VII hospital in Siem Reap (with written consent from patients or legal guardians and study approval by the National Ethics Committee in Cambodia).
The King's Last Song" is the story of an Khmer Rouge member and a young boy as irregular circumstances put them on a quest to rescue an archeologist and his most treasured find--a book written by one of the most celebrated Kings of Cambodian kings, King Jayavarman VII.
He had been trying to find the spot where French archaeologists first discovered the sculpture's remains in 1925 near Angkor Thom, the walled city of King Jayavarman VII (1125-1215).
Wat Phra Men was twice enlarged, and State III, wrote Jean Boisselier in 1965, must date from the reign of Jayavarman VII, when the Cambodian empire attained its furthest extent, in the late 12th century.
Ravishingly photographed yet thoroughly scholarly, with archive material and impressively detailed scaled drawings, this historical exploration of Khmer architecture and culture from the pre-Angkorian era to the reign of the great king Jayavarman VII not only covers familiar sites in Cambodia, but also ventures further afield to Laos and Thailand.
Some fifty years later, the Angkorian king Jayavarman VII patronized a type of Mahayana Buddhism in which the Buddha sitting on the snake was the central deity, with the bodhisattva Lokesvara and the goddess Prajnaparamita as flanking images in a triad.
Correlation of the 17 fire shrines listed to Phimai (Vimaya) with the number of known laterite temples along the Northwest road (see Living Angkor Road Project 2008: 249) points to a direct relationship between these buildings and Jayavarman VII.
However, some bas-reliefs in the Bayon Temple, commissioned by Jayavarman VII (1181-1219), who changed worship from Vishnu to Buddha, depict common people in everyday life (village and market scenes, people selling pots and wine or playing games), not religious themes.